Posts

Larva of a carpet beetle

6333 Location found: Kitchen cupboard (where pots and pans are stored). Bug size: 5 mm from head to tail. Winter season. Bug alive or dead: alive (barely). I’m not sure what the fuzzy stuff is attached to the tail of the bug. It might just be a dust bunny that the bug got stuck in. Please email me if you are or are not able to identify it. From Calgary

Number 6333 This is a larva of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae); likely in the genus Anthrenus (varied carpet beetle, etc.).  Click here  for control recommendations.

larva of an Asian multi-colored lady beetle

6317 Appeared in my second-floor bedroom (possibly dropped from ceilling), stayed for a picture and then disappeared when I left room. Just outside Fredericton, NB September 27 autumn. High of 20° sunny and breezy day following heavy rain and two nights of frost. From Maugerville, NB

Number 6317 This is a larva of an Asian multi-colored lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), an introduced species having a very widespread distribution and that goes by several other common names. Click here for more detailed information.

Larva of a darkling beetle

6311 Can you please tell me what this is. From Toronto, ON

Number 6311 This is a larva of a darkling beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), likely one of the so-called mealworms in the genus Tenebrio see Click here for an example. These sometimes will infest dry stored food products, especially grain-based.

Mature larva or puparium of a rodent bot fly

6308 Found this in my basement on a wooden shelf in Ottawa, end of August, what the heck is it? From Stittsville, ON

Number 6308 This is a mature larva or puparium of a rodent bot fly (Diptera: Oestridae; Cuterebra spp.). The larvae of these flies develop under the skin of their host, breathing through a hole they make in the skin. When ready to pupate, they enlarge the hole and emerge, then seek a sheltered place to undergo pupation and transform into the adult fly. Click here for more detailed information.

larva of a scarab beetle

6302 Stumbled across it , seems to bite i put a twig near it and it chomped down! Just want some info looks freaky but cool

Number 6302 This is a white grub, the larva of a scarab beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Ones like this can be serious lawn/turf pests as they feed on the roots of grasses just below the soil surface –  Click here for more information.

larva (caterpillar)

6299 From North Windham, Connecticut

Number 6299 This is a larva (caterpillar) of a monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus; Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Click here for detailed information on this fascinating insect.

Larva of a snakefly

6289 Approximately 12 mm long, moves in a snake like fashion. From Victoria, British Columbia

Number 6289 This is a larva of a snakefly (Raphidioptera: Raphidiidae), likely in the genus Agulla. These are general predators on other small arthropods, mainly other insects.

Larva of a larder beetle

6286 Have no clue what these things are, its like the larva shed their skins and turn into these black nightmarish things. I hope they aren’t bad for my health or my dogs’ health, I’ll do anything to get rid of them. The larva has spikey looking hair on them and these pronged horns on the back and when they grow up their bigger and their tails are longer, they do look like they bite but I’m not sure yet. They have six legs though all together. From Calgary Alberta

Number 6286 This appears to be a larva of a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), a cosmopolitan pest that will feed on a wide variety of organic materials, especially those of animal origin. Click here for more detailed information including some control suggestions.

Larva of a beetle

6280 First found this bug behind my kitchen sink, then on the floor in my bathroom. Found this one in my shower with me this morning. Roughly over a centimetre long. Just need help identifying so I can get rid of them properly. From Dowling, Ontario

Number 6280 This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/skin/hide/larder beetles and allies). These can feed on a wide variety of organic materials (primarily those of animal origin), including accumulations of dead insects. You might check any clothing/fabrics, especially those in long-term storage, that incorporate wool or silk for signs of insect damage.

Larva of a Green Lacewing

6236 This tiny little guy was found on the dash of my truck. He was maybe 3 mm long. I live in Edmonton, Alberta. Can you tell me what he is? I’ve never seen anything quite like it here. Thanks! From Edmonton Alberta

Number 6236 – This is a larva of a green lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae); these generally are considered as beneficial as they prey on a wide variety of small, soft-bodied arthropods such as aphids, small caterpillars, spider mites, thrips, etc. Click here for some images.