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See also:  Spider categorized species photos
More spider photo identifications
pest-id-photos page 1
 pest-id-photos page 2
pest-id-photos page 3

 ( Out of focus, poorly lit and subjects too small to identify will not be published.)
Spider photos:  Only very high quality unusual spider photos will be published

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Nymph of a stink bug

7050.          Found indoors on belt from closet. Body is approx 6mm long and 5mm wide (not including antennae). Aug 2020. Calgary, AB. Canada

Number 7050. This is a nymph of a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), but I cannot provide a specific identification. It may be a predatory species. Click here for an image & Click here for more information.

Scarab beetle

7049.        Landed on my boyfriend’s back while he was watering the plants on our balcony. He came inside and I saw it. North York, ON. Canada

Number 7049. This is a scarab beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). From the appearance of its flattened elytra, it may be in the genus Osmoderma. Those are not pests; their larvae live in decomposing punky wood. Click here for more detailed information.

Elm seed bug

7048.        Finding these all over our house and seem to be living in our front door frame. They are quite small but large in number! Any idea what these are and how to get rid of them? Kelowna, BC. Canada

Number 7048. This is an elm seed bug, Arocatus melanocephalus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Lygaeidae), an introduced species that has become a nuisance pest in many areas. Click here for more detailed information.

Long-horned wood-boring beetle

7047.         It was about 2-3 inches long. Kamloops, British Columbia. Canada

Number 7047. This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae; possibly Prionus californicus, one of the largest beetles in Canada. Commonly known as the California root borer, its larvae can cause serious damage to tree and vine roots. Click here for more detailed information.

Larva of a larder beetle

7046.       Found in bathroom twice one July and one in August. Leduc, Alberta. Canada

Number 7046. This is a larva of a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) or a close relative. Click here for some control recommendations.

Nymph of an assassin bug

7045.      I found this little guy while dusting. Thought it was lint until I saw it moving. I have no idea what it is, pure white. Smiths Falls, ON. Canada

Number 7045. This is a nymph of an assassin bug known as a masked hunter (Reduvius personatus; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), a cosmopolitan species often found indoors and reputed to have a very painful ‘bite’- Click here for more detailed information.

Hairy chinch bug

7044.        Hello, I have noticed my backyard infested with tiny black bugs, I can see them on grass, walls, patio furniture etc. Can you please let me know what is this and if any product to treat them. Milton, Ontario. Canada.

 

Number 7044. This appears to be a hairy chinch bug, Blissus leucopterus hirtus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Blissidae), a lawn/turf pest – Click here for details including control recommendations.

Stilt-legged fly

7043.        I have found these recently in my kitchen. We have a new exotic plant but other than that we cannot figure out where they are coming from. Killed 6 yesterday and usually see one or two per day for the last week to 10 days.
Thank you. St. Albert, AB. Canada

Number 7043. This appears to be a stilt-legged fly Diptera: Micropezidae); possibly Taeniaptera trivittata. These are harmless scavengers; Click here for more detailed information.

Flat-backed millipede

7042.        This crawler is skinny and about an inch long, and comes out in late July. They are near the pool and in the basement for about a month then disappear. Thanks for any light you can shed. Fenwick, Ontario. Canada

Number 7042. This is a flat-backed millipede, possibly a garden millipede, Oxidus gracilis (Polydesmida: Paradoxosomatidae). These primarily are scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but may become nuisance pests when they occur in large numbers. Click here for more detailed information..

Caddisfly

7041.         Have been chasing these around for days. Cannot figure out where they are coming from and how to get rid of them. Thought they came from outside, but the house has been mosquito net proofed for days now. Raid Home did not really help. Montreal, Quebec. Canada

Number 7041. You must live near a body of water (stream/pond/lake) as this appears to be a caddisfly (order Trichoptera) that has lost most of its wing scales – Click here for an example of an intact specimen. Their larvae are aquatic, and most species construct tubular cases that they live in. These are completely harmless, and will do no damage.

Predaceous diving beetle

7040.        Found at night, inside my house, in the bathroom. August 2020. 23 degrees Celsius outside. Oshawa, Ontario. Canada

Number 7040. This is a predaceous diving beetle (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). They and their larvae (“water tigers”) are general predators on other small aquatic life forms. They also are very strong fliers, and may be found quite some distance from any water source.

Nymph of a hairy chinch bug

7039.         There are hundreds of these small bug crawling all over the back of my house. Some have the white stripe some do not. I have no idea how to get rid of them or where they are coming from. Elmira, Ontario. Canada

Number 7039. This looks like a nymph of a hairy chinch bug, Blissus leucopterus hirtus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Blissidae), a lawn/turf pest – Click here for details including control recommendations.

Larva of a larder beetle

7038.       Been finding these on top of my dryer periodically. July, August. Usually 3 or 4 at a time. Will curl like a crescent moon if touched. About 1/4” in length. Didn’t realize they had furry multiple legs until I macro zoomed the photo. Ardmore, AB. Canada

Number 7038. This is a larva of a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) or a close relative. They only have six small legs near the head end (left, in your image); the ‘furry’ legs are just long setae (body hairs).  Click here for some control recommendations.

Bristletail

7037.      I found it dead in my house, I am wondering what it is? Montréal, QC. Canada

Number 7037. This is a bristletail (order Zygentoma) in the family Lepismatidae that has lost its scales and some of its appendages. It might be either a firebrat (Thermobia domestica) or a silverfish (Lepisma saccharinum); both are cosmopolitan nuisance pests – Click here for more detailed information.

Broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil

7036.        We find them outside and inside. We live in Newmarket, Ont. Canada

Number 7036. This is a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). It might be a black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus; Click here for an image.

Nymph of a hairy chinch bug

7035.      Just out of the blue we found thousands of these bugs all over or front walkway, porch, planting areas and around the perimeter of our property. It’s been very hot with little rain until recently. I killed them the first time with a bug killer but found them again in full force tonight. I killed them with water and dish soap this time but I’m sure they’ll be back. Thanks so much for your help. Bolton, ON. Canada

Number 7035. This looks like a nymph of a hairy chinch bug, Blissus leucopterus hirtus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Blissidae), a lawn/turf pest – Click here for details.

Cicada

7034.        Found this thing in my kitchen. Very frightening. Kitchener, Ontario. Canada

Number 7034. This is nothing to worry about; it is the empty ‘shell’ (exoskeleton) of a cicada (Hemiptera/Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae), likely in the genus Neotibicen (annual/dog-day cicadas). Click here for a video of the molting process.

Assassin bug

7033.         Outside my room on balcony was trying to fly too. Kandal, Phnom Penh. Cambodia

Number 7033. This appears to be an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae). These are general predators on other terrestrial arthropods; Click here for another example.

Star-nosed mole

7032.        Notth Bay, Ontario. Canada

Number 7032. This is a star-nosed mole, Condylura cristata, a most unusual creature with an incredibly sensitive olfactory system. Click here for more detailed information.

Western conifer seed bug

7031.      This spider has been hanging around our brown compost bin for the last couple of days. Please tell me what kind it is. Many thanks. Mont Tremblant, Quebec. Canada

Number 7031. This is not a spider, but a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). Although harmless, these can become nuisance pests when they enter homes in search of shelter. Click here for more detailed information.

Rove beetle

7030.    This bug total killed every onion plant in my garden. Rockyford, Alberta. Canada

Number 7030. This appears to be a rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). These would not have hurt your onions as they are predators, not herbivores. They may have been feeding on whatever was killing the onions. Click here for a detailed explanation.

Naiad (larva) of a dragonfly

7029.      We found this buried in the mud in the creek that runs through our farm in July. We’ve never seen anything like it and have been on this farm for over 40 years! Stouffville, Ontario. Canada

Number 7029. This is a naiad (larva) of a dragonfly; they are general; predators on other small aquatic life forms. Click here for more detailed information.

Broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil

7028.       Please identify. Thank you! Kanata, ON. Canada

Number 7028. This appears to be a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. Click here for an image.

Larva of a lacewing

7027.     While sitting on our sofa during the evening I noticed this bug walking on my wife’s leg. I gently allowed it to walk onto my finger nail, it walked down my finger stopped and began biting my hand. I killed it with a Kleenex tissue. Bug was about 1/8” to 3/16” long. I took the picture with my iPhone 8, I was able to zoom in for a much better view. It had huge mandibles. Other day same bug was biting my 2 yr old granddaughter on her back while she was in her small wading pool. What kind of bug is this? Date is Aug 3. Hot and humid. We just had thunderstorm with lot of rain. Thanks for your help! Hagersville, Ontario. Canada

Number 7027. This is a larva of a lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). These are general predators on other small, soft-bodied arthropods such as aphids and caterpillars. For reasons unclear, they sometimes will ‘sample’ human skin, but their bite is harmless. Click here for more detailed information.

Springtail

7026.    They are all small for now but they are slow and I count like 4 to 5 now. Montreal, Quebec. Canada

Number 7026. This looks like a springtail, a primitive arthropod in the order Collembola. However, these usually jump when disturbed. Click here for details

Nymph of an assassin bug

7025.      This was crawling in my office today. What is it? Looked like a pile of dust moving across the ground. Lafayette, Colorado. United States

Number 7025. This is a nymph of an assassin bug known as a masked hunter (Reduvius personatus; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), a cosmopolitan species often found indoors and reputed to have a very painful ‘bite’- Click here for more detailed information.

Soldier fly

7024.       Hi I’m from Edmonton, Alberta. It’s super hot here at 30C. Found whatever this is on my patio table. Kept spinning in a circle. Just curious to what it is. Thanks. Edmonton, Alberta. Canada

Number 7024. This is a soldier fly, Diptera: Stratiomyidae; the adults frequent flowers and may aid in pollination while the larvae primarily are scavengers on decomposing organic matter. I often find their larvae in our compost pile. Click here for more detailed information.

Psocids

7023.      Clusters of these bugs appeared this week (August1) on various tree trunks. The picture is a medium sized cluster. Some trees had many clusters. We are wondering what they are and if they are harmful to the trees. Thank you. Apsley, Ontario. Canada

Number 7023. These are psocids (Psocodea: Psocidae) known as bark lice or tree cattle. They are completely harmless. Click here for more detailed information.

Lily leaf beetle

7022.       We first noticed these bugs in July, eating the leaves off our lilies. Edmonton, Alberta. Canada

Number 7022. This is a lily leaf beetle, Lilioceris lilii (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), an introduced pest species. Click here for more detailed information.

Spitting spider

7021.      It is about the size of my thumb nail. Thank you! Harleysville, Pennsylvania. United States

Number 7021. This is a spitting spider (family Scytodidae) in the genus Scytodes. These spiders do not spin a capture web, but use a glue-like silk ejected from their mouthparts to subdue their prey. They are harmless to humans; Click here for images and more detailed information.

Ground beetle

7020.        Found one of these bugs late last night in my apartment and over the night and into the morning I found a few more. Can fly as my roommate found hers by hearing it fly past her. Found in Nova Scotia. Thank you! Halifax Nova Scotia, Canada.

Number 7020. This is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae). The vast majority of these are general predators on other small arthropods; mainly other insects. Click here for more detailed information

Broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil

7019.      Have noticed these all around my entrance doors, soffits (painted white) and they have made there way into the house, generally hang around the windows. This is the second or third year now that they have showed up. They seem to be more crawlers (6 legs) then fliers, and have a hard shell. Their colour is a lighter green and they are about 1/4 inch long with antennas. Can you please help identify them, and how I can eliminate and or keep them from coming back. Also, any health risks that I should be concerned about? Thanks in advance for your help. Stouffville, ON. Canada

Number 7019. This is a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). Short of hermetically sealing your house, it would be nearly impossible to keep some from gaining entry. They are harmless; simply vacuum/sweep them up and dispose of them. Click here for an example.

Broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil

7018.        Small spider like beetle, found 10+ near screen door climbing walls and jump away when i try to squish. in late July warm weather. AURORA, ON. Canada

Number 7018. This is a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. Click here for an example.

Pigeon tremex

7017.      Just wondering if anyone knows what kind of wasp/hornet this is. Midland, Ontario. Canada

Number 7017. This looks like a pigeon tremex, Tremex columba (Hymenoptera: Siricidae);  Click here for an image. Wasps in this family often are called horntails; they lack a stinger (what looks like one actually is their ovipositor) and are harmless to humans.

Nymph of a hairy chinch bug

7016.        I found lots of small bugs in my backyard ground and fence. Could you please help me to identify what is this bug? I can see it has 2 white line on back. one white line is long than another one. Thanks. Richmond Hill, Ontario. Canada

Number 7016. This looks like a nymph of a hairy chinch bug, Blissus leucopterus hirtus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Blissidae), a lawn/turf pest – Click here

Robber fly

7015.      I found it indoors, sounded like a wasp but it is way more scary, dark colored and weird. Kavadarci Macedonia

Number 7015. This is a robber fly (Diptera: Asilidae); these are ambush predators on other arthropods, mainly other insects. Click here for an example

Predaceous diving beetle

7014.    This big black shiny beetle is approximately an inch long. This pic was taken July /20 in the port au port area of NL. It was outside. I have look at so many black beetles and cannot identity this one … my brother in law have lived in NL for 60 years and have never seen any beetle like this one . I hope to find out what kind of beetle this is. Thank you. Black Duck Brook, Newfoundland. Canada

Number 7014. This is a predaceous diving beetle (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae); from the appearance of its front tarsi, it appears to be a male. They and their aquatic larvae (‘water tigers’) are voracious predators on other small aquatic life forms. The adult beetles are strong fliers that may be found at quite some distance from the nearest water.

Cigarette beetle or a Drugstore beetle

7013.     Mainly on the bed. Cairo, Egypt.

Number 7013. This is a beetle in the family Anobiidae; likely either a cigarette beetle (Lasioderma serricorne) or a drugstore beetle (Stegobium paniceum). Both species will feed on a very wide variety of dry stored food products, including spices and tobacco. You should check all food storage areas for signs of infestation. Click here for more detailed information

Soldier fly

7012.    Hi I’m from Edmonton, Alberta. It’s super hot here at 30C. Found whatever this is on my patio table. Kept spinning in a circle. Just curious to what it is. Thanks. Edmonton, Alberta. Canada

Number 7012. It’s a soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) in the genus Stratiomys. They are harmless and may air in pollinating flowers. Click here for more detailed information.

Nymph of a planthopper

7011.     This bug is smaller than a pin head – has a fluffy white tail and bulging eyes. Looks like a mini crab. Was on my chair outside – the fluffy tail got my attention. Photo taken with my phone with as much zoom as I could I hope it’s close & clear enough – it was on its own. Thank you! I’m so curious. Gatineau, QC. Canada

Number 7011. This is a nymph of a planthopper, Hemiptera/Auchenorrhyncha: Fulgoroidea, likely in the family Acanalonia –  Click here for an example. Many planthopper nymphs secrete a filamentous wax the tip of their abdomen and various other areas according to species. This wax provides protection from predators and prevents desiccation as well as protecting them from spider webs or puddles; they don’t stick to spider webs and they float quite well and can swim to safety.

Horse fly

7010.    I found this bug on my front porch last Saturday (July 25). I live in Longueuil, on the south shore of Montreal. It looked like a fly, but was about 1 1/2 to 2 inches long. It was totally black. It wasn’t aggressive; it was on its back when I got home, so I righted it and it stayed on the porch a few minutes before flying away. Saint-Hubert, Québec. Canada

Number 7010. This is a large horse fly (Diptera: Tabanidae) in the genus Tabanus. You are lucky that it chose not to try and feed on you as one of this size would have a very painful bite! Click here for an image

Carpenter bee or a Bumble bee

7009.     I have found approximately 18 of these very large bees in my house in the past 4 to 5 days. They seem to be coming up from the basement. They are very large! I am sure it is a common bee but I find it unusual to find them indoors so I wanted to check. Right now we are practising a catch and release bee program! Thank you for you time. Peterborough, Ontario. Canada

Number 7009. It’s either a carpenter bee (Xylocopa sp.) or a bumble bee (Bombus sp.). Look at their abdomen – if it appears shiny and all black, it’s a carpenter bee, if it’s hairy (can be either all black or with yellow or orange markings/bands), it’s a bumble bee – Click here. In either case, it is unusual to find numbers of them indoors. If they are carpenter bees, you should find signs of their tunnels in untreated bare wood. If they are bumble bees, they may have a nest somewhere in the basement.

Nymph of a German cockroach

7008.    I’ve been seeing them on the kitchen counter, below the sink, and the odd one in the bathroom. They are usually less than 3 cm long, black with grey stripes and a grey rectangle on the back. They are quick when they see you but easy to kill. Brampton, ON. Canada

Number 7008. This looks like a very young nymph of a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blatodea: Blattellidae). This species is notoriously difficult to control, you may wish to consult a professional.  Click here for additional information.

Broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil

7007.     Ottawa, ON. Canada

Number 7007. This is a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. Click here for an example.

Great golden digger wasp

7006.    Hamilton, Ontario. Canada

Number 7006. This is a great golden digger wasp, Sphex ichneumoneus (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae). The females dig tunnels in loose soil that they then provision with paralyzed insects for their young. They are not at all aggressive, and unlikely to sting unless you were to pick one up. Click here for more detailed information.

nymph of a hairy chinch bug

7005.      There are swarms of these at the rear of my house (west side) they appear to be most active in afternoon when the sun is warm. Only noticed them the last week or so (it’s July 26) . They are all over the brick of my house and patio. I can see them in the nearby grass as well. They are pretty small and I don’t see any larger one around. Sunderland, Ontario. Canada

Number 7005. This appears to be a nymph of a hairy chinch bug, Blissus leucopterus hirtus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Blissidae) – Click here for details.

Adult hairy chinch bug

7004.      Found a swarm of these outside on the patio, around the window frames and the bottom of the outside walls. Very tiny, about 1/16 of an inch, and literally hundreds of them walking around. Montreal, Quebec. Canada

Number 7004. This is an adult hairy chinch bug, Blissus leucopterus hirtus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Blissidae), a common lawn/turf pest – Click here for details.

Young nymphs of a squash bug

7003.      Looking for the name of this garden insect. Also how to eradicate from garden. Tx. Tecumseh, Ontario. Canada

Number 7003. These are young nymphs of a squash bug, Anasa tristis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). Click here for details on their life cycle as well as some control recommendations.

Nymph of an assassin bug

7002.      Hi, can you please let me know what kind of insect this is? I found it indoor on the floor, doesn’t seem to be able to fly, 6 legs, 2 antenna. When I found it it was originally white, but when I washed it the white stuff came off. Worried it might be a tick. Thank you!

Number 7002. This is a nymph of an assassin bug known as a masked hunter (Reduvius personatus; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), a cosmopolitan species often found indoors and reputed to have a very painful ‘bite’- Click here for more detailed information.

Orb-weaving spider

7001.        I was at the park with my kids and noticed this little guy clinging to a stick on of my daughters was playing with. Never seen a spider like this an have been unable to find a matching photo on the internet. It was very small, maybe the size of a green pea. Just curious. Thanks! Saint-Lazare, Québec. Canada

Number 7001. This is an orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae); it appears to be in the genus Araneus. Click here for an example; but I am unable to put a specific name on it. I suspect that it is an unusual colour morph of an otherwise common species.

Other photo id pages. (click number above)