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See also:  Spider categorized species photos
More spider photo identifications
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 pest-id-photos page 2
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 ( Out of focus, poorly lit and subjects too small to identify will not be published.)
Spider photos:  Only very high quality unusual spider photos will be published

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Brown marmorated stink bug

7152.      Woke up today Jan. 7, in my second flr bedroom with this staring at me on stucco ceiling, only moved couple of steps and stayed in one spot. Appeared fairly large about size of June bug. Thornhill, Ontario. Canada

Number 7152. This is a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). This is an introduced species that has become a pest, primarily in orchards, in many areas of North America. They will come indoors in search for shelter, but do no harm there. Stink Bug detailed information 

Broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil

7151.      Found in January on the ceiling, walls and bathroom of our home. I haven’t seen them fly, and they don’t seem overly quick. Wainwright, Alberta. Canada

Number 7151. This is a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. Weevil Image 

Western conifer seed bug

7150.      It was found on the wall of a closet. It is covered in white dust because we vacuumed it up. The back part body had some brown and lighter brown variations (kind of spots). Oakville, Ontario. Canada

Number 7150. This is a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). Although harmless, these can become nuisance pests when they enter homes in search of shelter. Conifer Seed Bug detailed information 

Caterpillar of a moth

7149.      Found these very small, tiny bugs around our sliding door to the front balcony. Some seem to be on webs as they are suspended, others are around the base of the door. Mississauga, Ontario. Canada

Number 7149. This appears to be a newly hatched caterpillar of a moth of some kind. When female moths find themselves trapped indoors, they sometimes will lay their eggs on a convenient surface; most often on or close to a ceiling. When the eggs hatch, the caterpillars will crawl about until they die of starvation.

Booklice (psocopterans)

7148.     You can see comparaison on size with the drywall screws. It’s winter here, photo taken 26 December 2020. They seems to like darkness since they move and try to hide when I put the light on. This is in my basement. It’s a brand new house and about 45% humidity. Thanks for your help! St-Marc-de-Figuery, QC. Canada

Number 7148. These are psocopterans known as booklice (Psocodea: Liposcelidae). They basically are nuisance pests, feeding primarily on mould spores and bits of decomposing organic matter. Booklice detailed information 

Stonefly (Plecoptera)

7147.    Appeared early May. Because of the super wasp scare, became interested. Have never seen another similar. North Vancouver, BC. Canada

Number 7147. This is not a wasp, but a harmless stonefly (order Plecoptera). From its size, it likely is in the family Pteronarcyidae (giant stoneflies). Their larvae are aquatic, and form an important component of the freshwater food web. Stonefly detailed information 

Larva of a carpet beetle

7146.      Hi, my daughter lives in Nanaimo BC, and found a few of these in her townhouse – they look a little bit fuzzy and they crawl around. They’re around 3 – 5 mm long. What are they? Port Alberni, BC. Canada

Number 7146. This is a larva of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Anthrenus (varied carpet beetle and allies). Carpet Beetle Detailed Information

Nymph of a grasshopper (Acrididae)

7145.      Pink grasshopper (?) on spinach in my greenhouse. Stillwater, PA. United States

Number 7145. This is a nymph of a grasshopper in the family Acrididae, its pink color is the result of a genetic mutation called erythrism; Click here for details.

Brown marmorated stink bug

7144.      About 3/4″ long, never has seen insect like this before, can climb glass surface – never have seen an insect do this before, slow moving; catch and release or drown? Ontario Canada

Number 7144. This is a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). This is an introduced species that has become a pest, primarily in orchards, in many areas of North America. They will come indoors in search for shelter, but do no harm there. Click here for more detailed information.

Grain beetle

7143.      Have seen about a dozen to two dozen of these guys in the past few weeks crawling up walls. They are very small, easy to kill. Wellington, Quebec. Canada

Number 7143. This is a grain beetle (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) in the genus Oryzaephilus (saw-toothed and merchant grain beetles). These can infest a wide variety of dry stored food products. Click here for more detailed information.

Brown marmorated stink bug

7142.     Have found these recently (2 month) appear in the house looks like they fly often find on the ceiling. London, Ontario. Canada

Number 7142. This is a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). This is an introduced species that has become a pest, primarily in orchards, in many areas of North America. They will come indoors in search for shelter, but do no harm there. Click here for more detailed information.

Spider beetles

7141.     They are small, maybe 1-2mm, there were about a dozen dead ones in a ceiling light fixture in an old triplex. MONTREAL, QC. Canada

Number 7141. These are spider beetles (Coleoptera: Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae); they will feed on an extremely wide variety of organic materials, and sometimes may be pantry pests. You should check all of your food storage areas for signs of insect infestation. Click here for more detailed information.

Maggot of a fly

7140.    Hi there, Recently I started to notice small, white crawling insects in the basement. Usually I notice them after coming from work and there could be up to 4 of them moving slowly. I cannot figure out where they are coming from. Checked walls, carpet, furniture. Would appreciate your help in identifying these critters. Thank you. Mississauga, ON. Canada

Number 7140. This is a larva (maggot) of a fly. There must be a food source for them somewhere in the basement, perhaps a dead mouse or spoiled produce; basically any type of decomposing organic matter. Once they reach their full size, maggots usually move away from their food source in search of a drier place to undergo pupation. Click here for details

Nymph of an assassin bug

7139.    November 30th, 2020 found this insect inside the house in the couch. About 1 cm long body. 6 legs and a pair of antennas. White powder all over body leaving marks on where it was on the couch. We had a bit of snow the past week. Currently 5 degrees. Thanks. Brossard, Quebec. Canada

Number 7139. This is a nymph of an assassin bug known as a masked hunter (Reduvius personatus; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), a cosmopolitan species often found indoors and reputed to have a very painful ‘bite’-  Click here for more detailed information.

Phidippus audax (Salticidae)

7138.      Cleveland, OH. United States

Number 7138. This is Phidippus audax, a common and widespread species of jumping spider (family Salticidae) known as the bold or daring jumper.  Click here for more detailed information.

Cockroach and Bed bugs

Hi, we had sign into a new apartment that had a fumigation about a month ago of course we worent told about the situation before signing and finally they are doing a second fumigation, we have a 8 apartment building and had a bad infestation in unit 3 that effected our unit, this week will be the second fumigation, basically what i want to know is will they get rid of all the cockroache and or bed bugs, since living here we had found 14 not mentioning the dead ones that wore left in a stove that I had removed after seeing the grose situation. We are going to try and leave the lease but are scared that even after the fumigation we will still have problems and bring them to our new place is there a way you can reassure us of this horrible situation. Thank you. Montreal

Unfortunately, there is no way of ascertaining/guaranteeing that the controls have been 100% effective. Click Here for a very comprehensive review on how to deal with bed bugs and Click Here for advice on how not to take cockroaches with you when you move.

Mites in chickens

What is the most effective and still available product for killing mites in chickens in northwestern Alberta? Diatamaceous earth is not very effective. Wembley

Control of mites on chickens is problematic to say the least, as there does not appear to be any treatment available that is approved for use in Canada. There are some ‘off label’ possibilities that might be considered; Click Here for a detailed discussion.

Wasp nest and Skunks

Hornet’s nest or Wasp nest and Skunks living under patio. Now that it is going into winter can I just use a broom to knock down the hornet/wasp nest? Someone told me to just leave the skunks and once they have their babies they will just leave. Is this true or do I have to contact pest control to get rid of them? Please help. Thank you and regards. Mississauga

It is safe to knock down/remove the wasp nest. Only the queen wasp survives the winter, and she most likely is holed up somewhere other than in the old nest. As for the skunks, Click Here for very detailed advice on dealing with problem skunks. This may help you to decide if professional help is needed.

Home gardens

Hello ! I’ve been asked to find out how effective IPM programs for home gardens actually are. Please send any info on what works and what is perhaps not so good. We all know what IPM is and your site is great but any info on effectiveness? Please and thanks, Creemore, Ontario

Wow. This is a difficult question to answer in a few words, as nearly every instance is a unique event, and assessment can be highly subjective – Click Here You might find this study (A National Evaluation of Landscape Integrated Pest Management Knowledge and Use in the United States) of interest Click Here I also found this link quite helpfulClick Here.

Grain beetle

7137.      These were found in my mother’s kitchen cupboard, drawer, and along the floor. They were inside containers of rolled oats and cereal boxes. Could you please identify, and let us know the best way to get rid of them and to prevent them from returning. Thank you. Sudbury, Ontario. Canada

Number 7137. This is a grain beetle in the genus Oryzaephilus (saw-toothed and merchant grain beetles). These can infest a wide variety of dry stored food products. Click here for more detailed information including control recommendations. Try & keep all our infestable dry food items either in sealable plastic containers or in the refrigerator.

Moth fly (Diptera: Psychodidae)

7136.      These small flies are plentiful in our finished basement. They don’t live long, and are mostly dust when you squish them. They only came out recently, I.e. Oct. Nov 2020. Not sure what they are or where they have come from. Can you help? Barrie, On. Canada

Number 7136. This is a moth fly (Diptera: Psychodidae). Also known as drain flies or sewer flies, their larvae feed on decomposing organic matter and are often found in floor drains, seldom-used commodes, and the like. Although they can be nuisances, they do no real harm, and chemical control seldom is required. Click here for some other suggestions.

Larva of a beetle (Dermestidae)

7135.     Toronto, Ontario. Canada

Number 7135. This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/hide/skin/larder beetles and allies); it looks like an Attagenus sp. (black carpet beetles). Click here  for some control recommendations.

Brown-banded cockroach

7134.      Found on kitchen cabinet at night. It’s the size of my index finger nail. Found Nov 19. Mississauga, Ontario. Canada

Number 7134. This appears to be a brown-banded cockroach, Supella longipalpa. Click here for details on its biology, and Click here  for some control recommendations.

Carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae)

7133.      Hi, I found this around 4mm insect on my bed. I also have bite likes on my body from last nights. Please let me know if it is a bedbug. Thanks. Montreal, Quebec. Canada

Number 7133. This is a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae); it may be a banded carpet beetle, Attagenus fasciatus (Coleoptera: Dermestidae). Also known as the wardrobe beetle, it is a cosmopolitan pest species. Click here  for some control recommendations. These would not be responsible for any bites.

Spider wasp (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae)

7132.       I found this flying insect being very lethargic outside the building I worked in back on Aug 29th 2018. Photos taken by me in Penticton, BC. After watching a Brave Wilderness video on YouTube this insect looks almost exactly the same as a Tarantula Hawk. Please identify. Thank you. Penticton, British Columbia. Canada

Number 7132. This is a spider wasp (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae), and it belongs to the same tribe (Pepsini) as tarantula hawks. It appears to be Calopompilus pyrrhomelas, the largest spider wasp reported from British Columbia; Click here for an image.

Tortoise beetle

7130.     Sparkling like gold on sunlight, and circled transparent shield. Calicut Kerala. India

Number 7130. This is a tortoise beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae; subfamily Cassidinae); it looks like Aspidimorpha sanctaecrucis – Click here for an image.

Nymph of an assassin bug

7129.    Found it in the kitchen. Carino, Ottawa. Canada

Number 7129. This is a nymph of an assassin bug known as a masked hunter (Reduvius personatus; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), a cosmopolitan species often found indoors and reputed to have a very painful ‘bite’- Click here for more detailed information.

Grain beetle (Coleoptera: Silvanidae)

7128.    Edmonton, Canada

Number 7128. This is a grain beetle (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) in the genus Oryzaephilus (saw-toothed and merchant grain beetles). These can infest a wide variety of dry stored food products. Click here for more detailed information

Beetle (Dermestidae)

7127.    Found in the crack of hardwood flooring. Calgary, AB. Canada

Number 7127. This is a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/hide/skin/larder beetles and allies); it might be in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetles). Click here  for some control recommendations.

European hornet, (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)

7126.    This was on our porch. We live south of Ottawa. I have never seen a wasp or hornet this big. It got very agitated when I brought my finger close so I put it behind it. Poor perspective I know. What type of hornet is this. My next door neighbour had a huge problem with hornets behind his siding. This one was way larger than the rest. Lombardy, Ontario. Canada

Number 7126. This is a European hornet, Vespa crabro (Hymenoptera: Vespidae), an introduced species that is the only true hornet in North America. Found them to be quite tolerant of human presence, and less irritable than their cousin, yellow jackets.  Click here for more detailed information.

Male wolf spider (Lycosidae)

7125.    Biggest, ugliest spider. Dropped from eaves, came from under the siding I think. I sprayed it with spider blaster, took a long time to die. it was the warm spell in early November. Waterloo, Ontario. Canada

Number 7125. This appears to be a male wolf spider (family Lycosidae). These spiders do not spin a capture web, but actively hunt down their prey (like wolves). In spite of their appearance and name, they are harmless to humans and excellent volunteer pest controllers to boot.

Clothes moth (Lepidoptera: Tineidae)

7124.    Found on walls, towels, not moving. a bit silvery in color. Vancouver, British Columbia. Canada

Number 7124. This could be a clothes moth (Lepidoptera: Tineidae). Click here for details as to how to determine if you have a problem, and Click here for some control recommendations.

Aphid

7123.      This bug is approximately 1/8”. We found them crawling from the back of our house to a gravel pathway at the beginning of November. The weather is sunny, around 17 degrees Celsius. Southern Ontario, Niagara. Canada

Number 7123. This is an aphid (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). These strictly are plant feeders; some species can vector viral diseases of plants. Click here for more detailed information

Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopalmatidae)

7122.      This bug was on the green at our golf course and I have never seen anything like this before. Osoyoos, BC. Canada

Number 7122. This is a relative of grasshoppers and crickets commonly known as a Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopalmatidae). Click here for more detailed information.

Fungus gnat

7121.      Little flying bugs everywhere. About 3mm long. Breslau, Ontario. Canada

Number 7121. This appears to be a fungus gnat (Diptera: Sciaridae). Their larvae often are found in very damp/wet soil having a high organic material content where they feed on fungal mycelium and very tender plant parts. They are best controlled by allowing the soil in potted plants to dry out as much as possible between waterings. Click here for more detailed information.

Banded horntail,(Hymenoptera: Siricidae)

7120.      Whitecourt, Alberta. Canada

Number 7120. This is a banded horntail, Urocerus gigas flavicornis (Hymenoptera: Siricidae). Click here for details on its life history.

Click beetle, (Coleoptera: Elateridae)

7119.      I found this bug today in one of my bedrooms and I saw two of these in the same place in the end of September. What are these? How to get rid of them. Thanks. Scarborough, Ontario. Canada

Number 7119. This is a click beetle, Coleoptera: Elateridae. No need to ‘get rid of them,” they are just accidental intruders that will do no harm indoors. Click here for more detailed information.

Aphid (Hemiptera/ Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae).

7117.      Kinburn, ON. Canada

Number 7117. This is an aphid (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). These strictly are plant feeders; some species can vector viral diseases of plants. Click here for more detailed information

Nymph of a cockroach (Blattodea: Ectobiidae)

7116.        Prince Albert, SK. Canada

Number 7116. This appears to be a nymph of a cockroach, likely that of a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Ectobiidae). Click here  for some control recommendations.

Young nymph of a cockroach

7115.          Photo is taken in underground basement of the house as mentioned. Surrey, BC. Canada

Number 7115. This is a young nymph of a cockroach, likely that of a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), a peridomestic species difficult to bring under complete control. Click here  for some control recommendations.

Larva of a carpet beetle

7114.         Usually on the baseboard. Bathroom seems to be the favorite spot. Abbotsford, BC. Canada

Number 7114. This is a larva of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Anthrenus (varied carpet beetle and allies). Click here for detailed information, including control suggestions.

Pupa of a multicoloured Asian lady beetle

7113.       Seen on rose bush leaves october2020, Waterloo, Ontario. Canada

Number 7113. This is a pupa of a multicoloured Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Click here for details on its life history.

Orb weaving spider (Araneidae)

7112.     Found in greenwich nova scotia want to know what kind it is. Wolfville, Nova Scotia. Canada

Number 7112. It’s a harmless orb weaving spider (family Araneidae)l; it appears to be in the genus Araneus. Click here for an example.

Cockroach (Blattodea)

7111.    Chicago, Illinois. United States

Number 7111. This is a cockroach (order Blattodea), but it does not appear to be any of the commonly encountered peridomestic pest species. Possibly just an accidental intruder. Click here for more detailed information.

Beetle (Dermestidae)

7110.      Found this while making my bed! I know it looks slightly different from the bugs I usually see though I was just in Europe. Let me know! Thanks. Montreal, QC. Canada

Number 7110. This is a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/hide/skin/larder beetles and allies); it might be in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetles). Click here for some control recommendations.

Aphid

7109.      Found several on a pillowcase just crawling around in the evening. Kingston, Ontario. Canada

Number 7109. This is an aphid (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). They must’ve gotten indoors accidentally. Click here for more detailed information

Wolf spider

7108.      What kind of spider is this?? Sarnia, Ont. Canada

Number 7108. It looks like a wolf spider (family Lycosidae). These are active hunters that do not spin a capture web, but hunt down their prey; they have excellent eyesight.

Western conifer seed bug

7107.      What is this? This is the second one within a few days I have found in my apartment. Abbotsford, BC. Canada.

Number 7107. This is a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). Although harmless, these can become nuisance pests when they enter homes in search of shelter. Click here for more detailed information.

Hummingbird clearwing sphinx moth

7106.      Campbellford, On. Canada

Number 7106. This is a hummingbird clearwing sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) in the genus Hemaris; it appears to be Hemaris thysbe. Click here for details on its life history.

Aphid

7105.      They appear outside my backyard, around my backyard door, on the brick wall of my house. After I step on them, a patch of red blood spread. First time seeing them after few days of rain, I have not seen them before. People mentioned seeing them lately around 10km away from my home. What are they? Are they harmful? Why they are red-blooded?

Number 7105. This is an aphid (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). The red you noted came from the aphids’ tissues and is not blood. These strictly are plant feeders; some species can vector viral diseases of plants. Click here for more detailed information

Other photo id pages. (click number above)