Micro Moth

6248 Please help me identify this bug that I found on the counter in my kitchen (which at one point was an addition on the original house) today, June 16, 2018

Number 6248 – This is a very tiny moth, a member of one of several families that collectively are referred to as microlepidoptera or micro moths. These usually can be identified only through dissection and examination under magnification. It is nothing that will infest anything indoors.

Black Soldier Fly

6247 Central Alabama, 06/16/18, on our way to another hot day. Found flying around kitchen previous night and again this AM. From Chandalar Circle Pelham United States

Number 6247 – This appears to be a black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae). They are harmless, and their larvae are scavengers on decomposing organic matter. Click here for more detailed information.

Caterpillar of a gypsy moth

6246 Multicolored Caterpillar! From Dunnvile Ontario

Number 6246 – This is a caterpillar of a gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Erebidae; subfamily Lymantriinae), a very destructive introduced pest species. Click here for more detailed information.

Larvae of Beetles

6245 I am thinking this is a wire worm but not sure all through  spring and summer they are in my ceiling light fixtures and randomly in my cupboards. Id like to know what kind of worm they are so i can try to get rid of them effectively. Thanks! From Grande prairie, Alberta

Number 6245 – These are larvae of beetles in the family Dermestidae (carpet/skin/hide/larder beetles and allies). The top two are in the genus Dermestes (larder beetles); I’m not sure about the bottom one; it might be in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetles). Click here for control/management advice.

Cigarette Beetle or Black Carpet Beetle

6244 Found this scrambling under my bed when I was doing an inspection. I did crush it a little, hence the break and ooze at the bottom. Scared it’s a bed bug, but it doesn’t look like bed bug pictures I found. From Toronto, ON

Number 6244 – This beetle could be either in the family Anobiidae (such as the cigarette beetle) or Dermestidae (such as the black carpet beetle); a clearer view of its antennae would be helpful. Definitely not a bed bug!

Jerusalem Cricket

6243 This was taken June 11, 2018 in Osoyoos, BC in the morning. It was approximately 1 ​1⁄4 inches long. It was found underneath a rubber made container and really ran to try and get underground again not unlike a crab at the beach when you lift the rocks. Any help knowing what this is would be appreciated as this has really stumped. my sister and I.

Number 6243 – This is a relative of grasshoppers and crickets known as a Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopalmatidae). For some odd reason, they also are called ‘potato bugs’ by some people.  Click here for images and more detailed information.

Stink Bugs

6242 Please help me for identification this insect. I don’t know that this insect is harmful or not. I have see this insect on green gram. haumangarh, Rajasthan

Number 6242 – These are stink bugs (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae); this family includes both plant feeders and predatory species. Usually, when you see a group of them at the same place, they likely are plant feeders, as predatory species tend to be solitary in habit. Your specimens bear a superficial resemblance to one known as the Bagrada bug (Click here), but they may be something different.

Ichneumon wasp

6241 Found this bug on my car today and haven’t seen anything like it before. From Aurora, Ontario

Number 6241 – This is an ichneumon wasp (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). This is a very large family comprising thousands of species, all of which are parasitic on other insects and spiders. They are harmless to humans.

Aspen Serpentine leafminer

6240 On June 4, 2018 I noticed several leaves on this poplar tree looking as though they had a silver sheen. On closer examination, the silver sheen looked like an intricate maze on each leaf ending with a small spot that might be an egg. About 10-15% of the leaves may be infected. It is only about 3-4 weeks since the leaves matured. From Canmore, AB

Number 6240 – This appears to be the work of the Aspen serpentine leafminer, Phyllocnistis populiella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae). Click here for more detailed information

Broad-nosed/short-snouted weevils

6239 Have had thousands of these small beetle looking insects show up through mid to end of May. They are congegrating around our house and shop doorways and garage doors. From Neepawa, Manitoba

Number 6239 – These are broad-nosed/short-snouted weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). Several species of these will enter buildings in search shelter, but will do no harm there.

Long-horned Wood-boring beetle

6238 Hey there, found this at about 10:30 pm, June 6th here in Fruitvale BC. About 20° indoors and 15° outside. It’s been pretty warm lately. The bug is about half an inch long or less. Not very active but it didn’t seem to like my getting close to it. Is this thing out to get me. From Fruitvale, British Columbia

Number 6238 – This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); it looks like Centrodera spurca, known as the yellow Douglas fir borer – see Yellow Douglas Fir Borer (Centrodera spurca) for an image.

Larva of a Green Lacewing

6236 This tiny little guy was found on the dash of my truck. He was maybe 3 mm long. I live in Edmonton, Alberta. Can you tell me what he is? I’ve never seen anything quite like it here. Thanks! From Edmonton Alberta

Number 6236 – This is a larva of a green lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae); these generally are considered as beneficial as they prey on a wide variety of small, soft-bodied arthropods such as aphids, small caterpillars, spider mites, thrips, etc. Click here for some images.

Rose Weevils

6235 Found on my rose bush. In wilkie Saskatchewan. Thank you for your help.

Number 6235 – These are rose weevils, sometimes also called rose curculios (Merhynchites bicolor; Coleoptera: Curculionidae); they can become serious pests on rose bushes; Click here for images and more detailed information.

Mayfly

6234 This weird looking flying Critter friend was chilling on my front screen door I’ve seen them before but have no clue what it is I’m guessing maybe something in the dragonfly family? From Dunnville, Ontario

Number 6234 – This is a mayfly (order Ephemeroptera); possibly in the genus Hexagenia. Mayflies spend the vast majority of their lives as immatures (nymphs/naiads) at the bottoms of streams, ponds, or lakes where they form an important part of the freshwater food web. The adults do not feed, and live only long enough (sometimes less than a day) to find mates and lay eggs.

Sowbug

6233 Found in basement and under rocks in yard, From Cochrane, Alberta

Number 6233 – This is a sowbug, a terrestrial crustacean in the order Isopoda. These are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter.

Plant Bug

6232 What is this thing? They are all over my backyard crawling on everything. I am afraid their get into my home and cause infestation. Please help From Mississauga, Ontario

Number 6232 – This is a plant bug in the family Miridae; these will not infest anything in your home.

Lady beetle

6223 Found this little guy on a counter at work. It’s been around 20° and warm here on Vancouver island in May. This beetle looks like a species of ladybug but had an unusual pattern. Same size as a traditional ladybug. From Courtenay, British Columbia

Number 6223 – This is a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae); it appears to be Myzia subvittata, known as the subvittate lady beetle – Click here for an image.

Caddisflies

6222 Waterloo Ontario. Hundreds of these outside and under deck and on front porch, anywhere high around entire house. But congregate on window screens and walls. They fly is like a meal moth but are very quick and difficult to kill. Go into any crevices and brickwork and can make themselves very narrow. Also like it underneath and in between my outdoor furniture cushions, where I also find webbing. They mate and then I find yellow silk web with hundreds of tiny pale-yellow eggs. Webbing is mainly on underside of windows and up high along walls and underside of fascia. But have also found eggs in between cushions and on underside of furniture. Started about second week of May for the past several years. When I go outside they fly in my hair and anywhere else. How do I eradicate this? It seems to last for 2-3 months. It’s ruining my outdoor enjoyment!

Number 6222 – These are caddisflies (order Trichoptera), related to butterflies and moths. Their larvae are aquatic where they constitute a very important part of the food web there. The adults are harmless, but some species can be nuisance pests when they occur in large numbers, see Click here. They would not be responsible for the webbing and eggs that you mentioned.

Funnel Weaver

6221 This was found in my bathtub a couple hours after bathing my son. I almost showered with it. What is it and is it dangerous? I live out on a farm and it was released far from the house. From Proton Station, Ontario.

Number 6221 – This is most likely is a funnel weaver (family Agelenidae) in the genus Eratigena; see Click here for an example. These are not dangerous to humans.

Saw Fly Larva

6220 What is this and is it harmful to my flowerbeds grass. There are a whole bunch of them between mine and my neighbors house. From Leduc, Alberta.

Number 6220 – This is a larva of a sawfly, it might be a grass sawfly in the genus Pachynematus (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae)Click here for an image. They are unlikely to cause significant damage; Click here for more detailed information.

Click Beetle

6219 Hello, this was walking across my office table. May 27, Exterior temperature was about 25 degrees, interior air controlled to 22. It seemed to be all one color, with wings. We did some planting recently of cedar trees that came from British Columbia. From Toronto Ontario.

Number 6219 – This is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae). The adult beetles primarily are leaf feeders, but very seldom cause any real damage. Their larvae (often called wireworms) have varied feeding habits; a few species can be garden/agricultural pests. Click here for more detailed information.

Eyed Elater

6216 I found this in my yard at noon. From Dunnville Canada.

Number 6216 – This is an eyed elater (Alaus oculatus; Coleoptera: Elateridae); North America’s largest click beetle. Their larvae are predators on other insects living in decaying wood. See Click here for more information.

Running Crab Spider

6215 Any idea what this guy is? He looked mean just hanging out on the fence. 

Number 6215 – This is a running crab spider (family Philodromidae) in the genus Tibellus; see Click here for an example. Spiders in this genus also are known as slender crab spiders; they all are harmless to humans.

Flea beetle – Phyllotreta sp

6214 In the last week, thousands upon thousands of these tiny tiny beetles have appeared on my fence and house siding. They seemed to suddenly appear out of nowhere. They come in 2 colors (solid black and patterned). This is the first year I’ve noticed them, but this is also the first year I’ve had a lawn or fence (sod laid last fall, just bare ground with no plants prior as I live in a new development). Are these just harmless beetles that have all hatched at once and will disperse on their own in the coming weeks or do I have a pest problem on my hands? Thanks so much!

Number 6214 – These are flea beetles, leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae; tribe Alticini). Some species can be very serious garden pests; the one you imaged looks like a Phyllotreta sp. – Click here for more detailed information,

Hacklemesh/Lace weaver spider

6213 Found this guy in my kitchen and handily escorted him outside to play, but am very curious as to what kind of spider it might be and should I have granted him leniency?

Number 6213 – This is a hacklemesh/lace weaver spider (family Amaurobiidae); like the vast majority of spiders, it has venom glands and thus technically can be considered venomous. However, they are not at all dangerous to humans. This spider appears to be Callobius severusClick here for more information.

Owlet Moth Caterpillar

6212 – Please help identify. From Samarth park, Surat Gujarat India

Number 6212 – This is a caterpillar of a moth in the family Noctuidae (owlet moths). It belongs to a subset of that family that includes many pest species such as cutworms and armyworms, but I cannot provide a more specific i.d. at this time.

Ground Beetle

6211 – Big Black Beetle from outside determined to make it to our door. Found this critter approx 1” long, not including antennae, on an evening of late May, outside on patio and was cooler temps. Top and bottom all black. Wondering what it is. From Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

Number 6211 – This is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae); it looks like Carabus nemoralis, an introduced European species. Ground beetles are for the most part, general predators on other small invertebrates. This species appears to specialize on slugs; Click here for more detailed information.

Spider Beetle

6210 I am not sure what this bug is, my wife has seen the bugs at least 3 times. From Toronto Ontario

Number 6210 – This is a spider beetle (Coleoptera: Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae) in the genus Mezium. These beetles are cosmopolitan nuisance pests that sometimes can infest dry stored food products, Click here for detailed information and also Click here for more information.

Moth Fly

6209  Hello, I live in Burlington Ontario. We have those flying insects, they look like flies but shorter with more round wings, they fly very quietly so they are not annoying like flies or mosquitoes but they started to get everywhere, we found them inside the coffee machine in couple of cases. Are they harmful? Where did they come from? How to stop them? From Burlinton, Ontario

 Number 6209 – This is a moth fly (Diptera: Psychodidae), Click here for an example. Also known as drain flies or sewer flies, these are nuisance pests that cause no real harm. Their larvae usually are found in small accumulations of very foul water, such as in seldom used floor drains or drip trays under refrigerators. Click here for more detailed information including control suggestions.

Scarab Beetle

6208  Found this guy on my screen door over the last couple nights around 11 pm. From Prince George, British Columbia.

Number 6208 – This is a type of scarab beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) that often are called May beetles or June bugs as they usually are most commonly seen in those months. They are attracted to lights at night, but are rather bumbling fliers and thus frequently seen on the ground under outdoor lights. Their larvae (white grubs) feed on roots of grasses and can be serious lawn/turf pests.

Sixspotted Orbweaver

6207 Hi there, I saw this very small spider in a flower. I’ve tried very hard to figure out what type of spider it is and I even looked at your identification photos with no luck. The picture is as zoomed in as my camera could get. As you can see it is bright yellow with bright red legs and red dots. It was in the summer and was found outside. I would love to know what kind of spider it is. Thanks

Number 6207 – This is an orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae); it looks like Araniella displicata, known as the sixspotted orbweaver . Click here for more detailed information.

Orb-Weaving Spider

6206 – Spider Identification

Number 6206 – This is a male orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae); likely in the genus Araneus. All orb-weaving spiders are harmless to humans.

European Hornet

6205 Please help identify, its about 2 inch long

Number 6205 – This is a European hornet (Vespa crabro; Hymenoptera: Vespidae). This introduced species is the only true hornet in North America as well as being the largest member of its family (Vespidae) here. It has been my personal experience that these are less aggressive than our native yellow jackets or bald-faced ‘hornets’, but care should still be taken when near their nest. Click here for more information.