Young nymph of an assassin bug

6685.      This is the only photo. This bug is very small. Maybe a millimetre. Slemon Park PEI. Canada

 

Number 6685.  This is a young nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter (Reduvius personatus). This is a cosmopolitan species often found in buildings where they prey upon other insects found there, They are reputed to have a very painful bite. 

Terrestrial crustacean

6684.      Found in the basement. Less than half an inch. Edmonton, Alberta. Canada

 

Number 6684.  This is a terrestrial crustacean in the order Isopoda. They go by a variety of common names, including sowbugs, pillbugs, slaters, woodlice, and roly polys. They are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but occasionally become nuisance pests when they occur indoors in large numbers.

Parasitic wasp

6683.      Found on the wall of my condo unit on a warm humid day after a few cooler rainy days. Not sure how it got in as balcony doors and windows are kept closed. Toronto, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6683.  This is a parasitic wasp, likely in the family Braconidae. These all are parasitic on other arthropods, mainly other insects. Click here for another example

Caterpillar

6682.      This was on my wall this morning. Looks similar to the scarlet malachite but without the pointy things. It was about 1 cm long. I live in BC. Thank you.

 

Number 6682.  This is a caterpillar rather than a beetle larva. One possibility is that it might be a caterpillar of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae); Click here for more detailed information, including some control recommendations. These often leave their food source when mature to find a suitable place to pupate. You should check any areas where dry food products are stored for signs of infestation.

Larva of a carpet beetle

6681.      Closet floor. Toronto, ON. Canada

 

Number 6681.  This is a larva of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetles and allies). Click here for some control recommendations.

Centipede

6680.      Found dead on the carpet near the sliding balcony doors. Quite large, between 1/2 to 3/4 inch. Calgary, AB. Canada

 

Number 6680.  This is a centipede (class Chilopoda). These are general predators on other small arthropods, and ones like this are harmless to humans. Click here for more detailed information.

Checkered beetle

6679.      Found on firewood near Alliston Ontario. Hopefully these photos are of better quality. Thank you. Alliston, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6679.  This is a checkered beetle (Coleoptera: Cleridae). These are general predators on other small arthropods, mainly other insects. Click here for an example

Nymph of an assassin bug

6678.      Taken 23rd of September. In the past few days I’ve repeatedly found bug bites with small white tubes that were easily pulled out. Now, I found this bug acting dead and not moving in any way to the point that I picked it up with needles under the wings to stage a photograph. It did not move until I opened the door, and it merely walked a few steps, shook it’s head, and “died” again. I am very puzzled, please help! Owen Sound, ON. Canada

 

Number 6678.  This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) in the genus Zelus. If this one were to bite you, you would know it as it is very painful. Click here for more detailed information.

Bumble bee

6677.      Larger than a quarter. Totally black with yellow in circle on back and around the neck. If it’s a bee I want to let it go.  Langley, British Columbia. Canada

 

Number 6677.  This is a bumble bee, Hymenoptera: Apidae, Bombus sp. These are valuable pollinators, and several species are endangered/threatened. Click here for an image.

Larva (maggot) of a lesser house fly

6676.      Thus bug was found on a pet rabbit in the evening and the bunny passed away over night… coincidence? We’ve never seen this type of bug but have recently moved here. Toronto, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6676.  This looks like a larva (maggot) of a lesser house fly (Diptera: Muscidae). Also known as a latrine fly, they breed in all manner of decomposing organic matter, Click here for details.

Male folding door trapdoor spider

6675.      Kamloops, British Columbia. Canada

 

Number 6675.  This is a male folding door trapdoor spider in the genus Antrodiaetus, Click here for an example. The males leave their burrows to wander about in search of females, which remain in their burrows. They are not dangerous to humans.

Female cross spider

6674.      Spider located in Quispamsis, New Brunswick on a house. Lower coverdale, New Brunswick. Canada

 

Number 6674.  This is a very gravid female cross spider, Araneus diadematus; Click here for an image.

Plume moth

6673.      September 22/19 on living room wall. Hanmer, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6673.  This is a plume moth (Lepidoptera: Pterophoridae). The T-shape resting pose is typical of this family. Click here for some examples.

Caterpillar of a tiger swallowtail butterfly

6672.      Williams Lake, BC. Canada

 

Number 6672.  This is a caterpillar of a tiger swallowtail butterfly (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae; Papilio sp.), possibly that of a Canadian tiger swallowtail, Papilio Canadensis; Click here for an image. Normally green in colour, these caterpillars often assume a brownish hue just prior to pupation..

Click beetle

6671.      This was on my bedroom floor. I heard a clicking noise and saw it was jumping and would make a click noise when it landed. What is it? BRAMPTON, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6671.  Well, strangely enough, it is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae). The ‘click’ occurs when they flex their body to right themselves from an upside-down position. Click here for details.

Cross spider

6670.      Keswick, Ontario. Canada

 

 

Number 6670.  This is a cross spider, Araneus diadematus; a very common and widespread orb weaver also known as the European garden spider on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Click here for more detailed information

Ichneumon wasp

6669.      Winnipeg, Manitoba. Canada

 

 

Number 6669.  This is an ichneumon wasp (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae); Click here for an example. These wasps all are parasitic on other arthropods, mainly other insects, and are harmless to humans.

Larva of an Asian multicolored lady beetle

6668.  What is this thing? Dangerous? HAMILTON, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6668.  This is a larva of an Asian multicolored lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). This is an introduced species that sometimes can be a pest when they enter buildings in large numbers. Click here for more detailed information.

Orb weaving spider

6667.  Hello! I found this large spider on my front door this morning. I am interested to find out what kind it is as I I’ve never seen it before. I tried to identify it myself, but had no luck. Thank you in advance! Moncton, New Brunswick. Canada

 

Number 6667.  This is an orb weaving spider in the genus Araneus. They are harmless to humans. Click here for an example.

Assassin bug

6666.  In my bedroom. Very oldhouse, so lots of entry points. It’s been damp lately. Low twenties temp. But it’s just about fall and we’ve had cooler weather and lots of rain lately. About 1.5-2cm long. Wingham, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6666.  This is an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae). They are general predators on other small arthropods, mainly other insects. Some species can have a very painful (but not dangerous) bite. Click here for more detailed information.

Praying mantis

6665.    I squash it on my front porch a few days ago. I have never seen an insect as such before and wonder what it is and if it bites? Thank you. Gatineau, Qc. Canada

 

Number 6665.  This is a praying mantis (order Mantodea) in the family Mantidae; I cannot tell you any more because of the damaged condition of this specimen. All mantids are general predators on anything that they can capture, but are harmless to humans. Click here for details.

Crab spider

6664.    Found this on my husband’s shoulder in the house, and kept it in a bag! Thank You so much. kapuskasing, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6664.  This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae). These are ambush hunters that do not spin a capture web, but simply lay in wait for something to come within grabbing distance. They are harmless to humans. Click here for more detailed information.

Spider beetles

6663.    Hi, Please help me identify these bugs, I keep finding them in the nooks and crannies of my old house. They are always in groups of many and they keep crawling. I have never seen them before in my life. Thank you. Karim. Montreal, Quebec. Canada

 

Number 6663.  These are spider beetles (Coleoptera: Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae) in the genus Mezium, likely M. affine, known as the shiny or northern spider beetle. These can be pantry pests, infesting a wide variety of dry stored food products. Click here for more detailed information.

Aphids

6662.    Tiny 5mm to 10mm, thousands of them seemingly behaving like ants on the move with back and forth traffic. Probably had a colony. Could possibly be feeding on the sap that’s shed from large popolar trees. Fort St. John, BC. Canada

 

Number 6662.  These are aphids (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). Also known as plant lice, they all are sap feeders and often secrete excess fluid in the form of a sticky substance called honeydew. Some species can vector viral diseases of plants. Click here for more detailed information

Flea beetles

6661.    We are located just south of Saskatoon Saskatchewan, Canada

 

Number 6661.  These most likely are flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae; tribe Alticini); Click here for details on their life cycle.

Fritillary

6660.    This was seen in Dunnville Ontario. Hamilton, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6660.  This is a fritillary (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae; Speyeria sp.) There are a few species that are so similar in overall appearance that I hesitate to make a specific identification from a single image. Scroll through the images of Ontario fritillaries at Click here for some examples.

Cobweb/comb-footed spider

6659.    Size: abt. 1 cm. Found Sept 13 2019, in Ottawa, Ontario, under an old piece of furniture in a loose web. Tentatively identified as Steatoda nobilis (?). Ottawa, Ontario. Canada

 

Number 6659.  This is Steatoda triangulosa, a cobweb/comb-footed spider in the family Theridiidae. This species is harmless to humans. Click here for more detailed information.

Nymphs of the southern green stink bug

6658.    Found these bugs, along with dozens more, all on spent anise hyssop flower heads in my garden. They do not move much. Haven’t been able to find any bug image on line that identifies it, so I do not know what to do … protect, or eliminate. Thank you in advance, Hanne J. Vancouver, B.C. Canada

 

Number 6658.  These are nymphs of the southern green stink bug, aka green vegetable bug (Nezara viridula; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). Definitely a pest species; Click here for more detailed information.

Western conifer seed bug

6657.    Hi there, I found this crawling on my desk in my room in the afternoon. It was crawling quite slowly, I used a fly swatter to kill it. When I crushed it I noticed that wings had come out. From what I can tell it had 6 legs and a set of antennas. I’m terrified of getting a cockroach infestation or any bug infestation for that matter! PLEASE HELP IDENTIFY THIS. Wolfville Nova Scotia, Canada

 

Number 6657.  I cannot be certain because of the mangled condition of the specimen, but it might be a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). Although harmless, these can become nuisance pests when they enter homes in search of shelter. Click here for more detailed information.

Weevil

6656.    This has been found in a house about 3 blocks from St-Lawrence river. Could you advise what it is please? Thank you. J.C. Montreal, Quebec, Canada

 

Number 6656.  This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), but I cannot tell much more from this image. If it is very small (4 mm or less), it might be a grain/granary weevil in which case you should check your food/seed storage areas for signs of insect infestation. Click here

Nymph of a German cockroach

6655.    Found a couple (maybe 4 of 5) in the kitchen aat different moments of the day in less than a week. Montréal, Quebec. Canada

 

Number 6655.  I cannot be certain because of the mangled condition of the specimen, but it might be a nymph of a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), a peridomestic species difficult to bring under complete control. Click here for some control recommendations.

Larva of a carpet beetle

6654.    Absolute phobia of bugs… not sure what this is… terrified it’s a bed bug.. please help. Medicine Hat, Alberta. Canada

 

Number 6654. This is a larva of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetles and allies). Click here  for some control recommendations.

Nymph an assassin bug

6653.    Hi, I have a picture of a bug that I found. Had a sharp pain shot up leg and saw little blood and then the bug on the ground in my washroom not sure what this was. Not sure if you could help out. Ontario

 

Number 6653. This is a nymph an assassin bug known as a masked hunter (Reduvius personatus; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), a cosmopolitan species often found indoors and reputed to have a very painful ‘bite’- Click here for more detailed information.