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Orb weaving spider

Orb weaving spider

5783   Hi there, Just wondering if you can id this spider for me. I took this photo this afternoon in a mosquito net under an apple tree nearby. I’m in Grantville, Cape Breton. It appears to have a small web in the net’s peak. It’s about 3 cm long tail to tip.  Thanks.  Adam

This is a male orb weaving spider in the genus Araneus; likely A. marmoreus, an extremely variable species. See http://tinyurl.com/jmh6ujq for another example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Sphinx Moth caterpillar

Sphinx Moth caterpillar

5782    This  Caterpillar was in Regina SASK Canada in AUG.  2016     Thanks  Conrad

This is a fully grown caterpillar of a sphinx moth (Lepidoptera; Sphingidae); likely an Achemon sphinx, Eumorpha achemon. See http://tinyurl.com/znasbkt for images and details on its life history. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

5781  This bug was found inside our hotel room in Vernon BC. It is the third we have found in the bedroom.

Like Nos. 5779 and 5774, this is yet another broad-nose/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

long tail black bug

Pelecinus polyturator

5780   I have been seeing this bug recently here in Saint John NB in my back yard. The bug is smaller then the photo makes it out to be. The body of the bug is about a cm and the tail would be about 4-5 inches. It also flies. Please let me know if you know what this bug is. Thank you!

This is Pelecinus polyturator  (Hymenoptera: Pelecinidae), it is parasitic on the larvae (grubs) of beetles in the family Scarabaeidae. See http://tinyurl.com/p9wnnt4 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

5779   Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. We are finding numerous bugs in our house (15-20 a day) … we would like to know if this is a pest and what steps we should take. Please see attached photo. additional info: very slow moving. 7-8mm long… , stop moving for a long time when we disturb them, VERY hard shell, everywhere in the house on walls, ceilings, floors … not sure if they can fly.   thank you very much, Seb. 

Like no. 5774, This is another broad-nose/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Cat-face orb weaver spider

Cat-face orb weaver

5778   It’s almost 2 inches big. It’s living between the windows (outside and inside) of townhouse in Edmonton. Photo taken mid August of this year. Please, please can you respond. Need to know if something to worry about, as there is a 1 year old baby as well 2 dogs. Thank you.  Dave H.

Nothing to worry about here – it’s a harmless orb weaver in the genus Araneus, possibly Araneus gemmoides, known as the cat-face orb weaver; see http://tinyurl.com/j9jjvy9 for an image. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Funnel weaver lair

Funnel Weaver spider lair

5777  Walking in the forest here in French River Ontario,  I came across a bunch of weird looking webs that I had never seen before.  I didn’t see any spider although i did look as close as I dared to.  lol  I have attached a few pictures of the tree with the webs.  I would greatly appreciate if you could identify these for me.  Thanks so much for your time!   Joanne. 

This appears to be the work of a spider in the family Agelenidae. Often called funnel weavers, these spiders lay in wait within their lair until a potential meal wanders onto the web, whereupon the spider rushes out to deal with it. See http://tinyurl.com/zrsh7uc for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Mormon cricket

5776 About 2.5 inches long, on a path in the community forest. What is this thing?

This is a shield-backed katydid, such as a Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae); see http://tinyurl.com/z88v86s for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Wood Rat

Wood Rat

Caught on my small mousetrap in my back yard in Pleasantiew  Edmonton

This looks like a young wood rat.  For more photos and information see:  http://pestcontrolcanada.com/wildlife-control/wood-rat-pack-rat

 

Wasp or fly larvae

5775  These larval sacks were protected in some fine insulating substance just like wool. Found them in a junction box on a wall outside.  (It even smelled like lambs wool.)  There were about ten of these brown, slightly crispy-shelled sacks.  Only one sack contained a set of 30 or so active larvae, the rest were nearly all milky, yellowish/white liquid. We’re in the Portland, Oregon, U.S. area. Really curious and unusual.  Can anyone help? Barrett and Susan.

This is another head-scratcher; I am unable to determine to my satisfaction whether these are wasp or fly larvae. If at all possible, can the contributor provide any image(s) of the sack-like structures before they were cut open? Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

5774     Hello,  We seem to finding more and more of these critters in our house near Calgary.  They started in one area in the basement and in an area in the garage but they are becoming more prevalent and found in other areas of the house.  They are only a couple of mm long and they are extremely slow moving.  When bothered they stop moving altogether and you could assume that they are dead.  They have 6 legs and a hard shell body.  The body appears to have a mottled, and slightly rough appearance.   What are they and how can we get rid of them?   Thanks,   Jeff

This is a broad-nose/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Reproductive male ants

 5773  Please identify. Osgoode,   Ontario,  taken at dusk.  Bruce and Terri  

These appear to be male winged ants. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

There is not enough visible detail to determine the species.

long-horned wood-boring beetle

5772   Hello.  I found this guy in a 5th wheel in Slave Lake AB.  He had hitched a ride from somewhere either there in the vicinity or in the Rocky Mountain House and Jasper areas. He was big for an insect, I thought, about an inch long….   I caught him in a plastic glass and put him outside. Any ideas?  I did look at your other pictures.  Lorie

This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). It resembles some species in the genus Monochamus (‘sawyers’); see http://tinyurl.com/zrsknym for an example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Sink bug nymph

5771  Any idea what this bug is?  I found it on a leaf in my garden on August 6th, 2016, Mississauga, Ontario.  Regards,  Mike C

This is a nymph of a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae); possibly in the genus Podisus  – see http://tinyurl.com/gmmc6p4 for an example. Bugs in this genus are called soldier bugs; they are general predators on other small arthropods, including many garden pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

thread-waisted wasp

5770  Can you Please adv8ise what this is, photo taken in my sons backyard this evening , Aug 15, 2016, Cambridge, Ontario, Canada?  Thank You  Christine

It’s a thread-waisted wasp (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) in the subfamily Ammophilinae; it looks like Eremnophila aureonotata . These are caterpillar hunters – see http://tinyurl.com/hex5o5a for some images. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Banded Argiope spider

banded Argiope spider

5769  Hello. This is in my garden. I would really like to know what it is!! I am terrified of them but I find this one intriguing. In the past 7 days its doubled in size. Hope you can help!!  Erin

This is Argiope trifasciata, an orb weaver known as the banded Argiope. It is quite common and very widespread, and like all other orb weavers, it is harmless to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/8sq4a9g for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Aphids

Aphids

5768  The attached photo was taken in the Boundary Waters of Minnesota in August, on the bark of a birch tree. It appears to be a tight cluster of fifty or sixty black 1/4″ six-legged insects(?), being “herded” (so it appears) by six or eight large black ants moving around the perimeter of the cluster. (You can see a couple of the ants on the periphery if you look carefully.)  Any help? Thank you.  Dick

These are aphids (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae), also known as plant lice, being tended by ants. The ants provide the aphids some protection against predators and in turn feed off the sugary secretions (‘honeydew’) of the aphids. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Bald faced hornets

Bald-faced hornets

5767  Hi my name is Diana and I live in Tecumseh Ontario and it is mid August. I have a Manitoba maple infestation of wasp like bugs that fly and sting. They are burrowing in the trunk of the tree.  There is no visible nest near them, yet they are swarming and burrowing into the trunks crevices from the ground up to  about 7 feet. We have a tree  that is approximately 20 feet away that has just recently died we’ve been told of Dutch elm disease, but I noticed these bugs in that tree as well.  There are bored holes throughout the trunk.  We thought the tree was in distress because of draught conditions here but it didn’t matter how much we watered it didn’t rebound.  Both trees looked very healthy in April /May.  The picture I am sending is of a medium sized bug… There are smaller ones and there is also a much larger one that I have seen where the body is almost 2 inches longer. 

These are bald-faced hornets, Dolichovespula maculata (Hymenoptera: Vespidae). They do not bore in trees, but may thoroughly investigate any crevices/cavities for other arthropods to prey upon. At this time of year, they still are primarily carnivorous, seeking out protein to feed their young. See http://tinyurl.com/htdelhs for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

5766  Beside the tweezers. Found in the corner of drywall. Summertime in Oshawa Ontario.  Jen

Unfortunately, this is a bed bug. See http://tinyurl.com/hwz5tea elsewhere on this site for more information and control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Mud dauber wasp

Mud dauber wasp

5765  Can you tell me what this is and is it dangerous?

This is a thread-wasted wasp (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae), it appears to be Sceliphron caementarium , known as the black-and-yellow mud dauber. They are  of danger only to the spiders that they capture, sting, and paralyze as provisions for their larvae. See http://tinyurl.com/gpubxfa for much more detailed information on these fascinating creatures. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Stink bug nymph

Stink bug nymph

5764   Good evening,  I came upon your website when I was trying to identify an insect I found outside in my tomato garden. I scanned through some pictures on your website but I didn’t see my exact bug. I’ve attached 2 photos of it having some lunch. I took these today, August 7th in Nova Scotia. It’s been fairly warm and dry here lately, if that matters. I have 3 raised garden beds inside a chain link dog kennel enclosure (to keep deer from eating my tomatoes) Anyhow, that’s where this sucker was at, on one of the posts.  Thanks in advance for any help you may be able to provide.  Kelly

This is a nymph of a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in the genus Podisus. Bugs in this genus are known as soldier bugs, and as general predators on many other arthropods often are considered beneficial by gardeners. See no. 5744 for another example and http://tinyurl.com/hhywusm for more detailed information. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

hump-winged cricket

hump-winged cricket

5763  Location of photo: North Okanagan   BC.  Question: Could you possible identify the following insect? It’s body is about one inch long.  Thank you .  Sincerely,  Heather

This appears to be Cyphoderris monstrosa, a hump-winged cricket (Orthoptera: Prophalangopsidae) known as a great grig -see http://tinyurl.com/zctwakz for an image. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

marbled orb weaver spider

marbled orb weaver spider

5762  I believe this to be an orb weaving spider – I don’t see one exactly like this on your site. This was found in Montreal, Quebec but may have hitched a ride back from the region north of Quebec City. Thank you for your help, we are fascinated by this amazing creature.  -Angus

This is an interesting colour variant of Araneus marmoreus, commonly known as the marbled orb weaver. It appears to be variety pyramidatus, which supposedly is found only in Europe; see http://tinyurl.com/zklhycz  Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Mayfly exoskeleton

Mayfly exoskeleton

5761  Kingston Ontario.  Live near water… Siding is covered with these for several weeks… Only about 1/4 long.  Don

This is a shed ‘skin’ (exoskeleton) of an immature mayfly. These insects are a vital part of the freshwater food web, but they can become nuisances when they emerge by the gazillions – see http://tinyurl.com/hkxk3y6. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Cicada nymph

Cicada nymph

5760 Found in our yard  we live in Georgetown Ontario.  Peggy 

This is a nymph of a cicada (Hemiptera/Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae), likely in the genus Neotibicen. These usually are called either annual cicadas (some emerge every year after spending two to five years underground) or dog-day cicadas (because they usually emerge in late summer). Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 

 

orb weaving spider

orb weaving spider

5759   My daughter may have got bit what is this? Is this even a spider.

This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Neoscona, likely N. arabesca – see http://tinyurl.com/j8zzap9 for an image. These spiders very seldom bite unless they are picked up and handled carelessly, and their bite is not at all dangerous to humans. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

5758  Hello,  I have been finding 2-3 of these a month in my (finished) basement in Calgary Alberta, year round.  They are often dead when I find them.  They move slowly and have a strong shell.  The largest was nearly 1 cm long but almost always they are around 7-8mm.  I think they are ‘Weevils’ but they don’t have the long snout that all other weevils seem to have.  If you could help me identify them I would be very grateful.  Tips for getting rid of them would also be good.  We don’t have any food downstairs, and I’ve never seen one anywhere near our kitchen.  Best, Rob

This is a broad-nose/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). It might be a black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus – see http://tinyurl.com/zjc5mfg for an image. These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there.  Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

leaf-footed bug

Leaf footed bug

5757   Lone Pine, Ca. Hot dry dessert at the base of Mt. Whitney. It was on my leg yesterday afternoon. I panicked at hit it and it sat still in the ground. Looks like it flies. Didn’t smell anything or hear it make a noise. My husband smashed it before I could study it. Lived here my entire life and have never seen one. People commented that they have been seeing them here lately. Jen.

This is a leaf-footed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae) in the genus Leptoglossus; likely L. clypealis – see http://tinyurl.com/zxjctfe for an image and http://tinyurl.com/gqdkvkd for more detailed information. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

5756   Randy from Alberta. Just noticed him hanging around my backyard and you can hear those 4 wings as it Flys. About 2.5-3″ long from head to stinger. 

This is wood wasp (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) in the genus Urocerus, it looks like Urocerus flavicornis; see http://tinyurl.com/gptjc33 for an image. Their larvae tunnel in the wood of dead/dying/unhealthy trees. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Wood boring beetle

Metallic wood-boring beetle

5755   This bug was found in Brockville Ontario, Canada, while camping by a lake. He has wings as I did see it fly. Could you please identify it for me? Thanks so kindly!  Eva

This is a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Also called jewel beetles because of their often iridescent colours, their larvae (flat-headed wood borers) usually are found tunneling under the bark of trees. Some species can be serious pests. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Strawberry worms

Millipedes in strawberries.

5754  These worms have been destroying my strawberries.  Found near Winnipeg, MB.  Dave

These ‘worms’ actually are millipedes, arthropods in the class Diplopoda. Some species will indeed damage tender plant parts (including soft fruits) that are close to or on the ground. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

 

Cicada exoskeleton

Cicada exoskeleton

5753   This bug (carcass) was about an inch long (a bit less).  Seen this week in Ottawa.  Hot weather.  Outdoors.

This is the exoskeleton of a cicada, likely one of the so-called annual (some emerge every year after spending two to five years underground) or dog-day (they usually emerge in late summer) cicadas. Most of these are in the genus Neotibicen. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Earwig

Earwig

5752  The attached photo is a bug that crawled out of a plum pit that my daughter was eating. They are from BC and I had just bought them today. Please tell me what this bug is. Thank you, Angela

This is an earwig (order Dermaptera). Earwigs are very common nuisance pests that usually do little if any actual harm; occasionally, they may cause damage to very tender vegetation. See http://tinyurl.com/h5m54vn for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

cobweb/comb-footed spiders

5751  Hi I am from Newfoundland Canada and I found these little guys climbing on my house right above my door and I’m just wondering what kind of spider they are. Can you help me please? I found it weird that 2 of them were hanging out together and seemed to be following each other.

These are cobweb/comb-footed spiders in the family Theridiidae; likely Enoplognatha ovata, an extremely variable species  -see http://tinyurl.com/jfpmop9 for an example. They are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Seed bug nymph

Nymph of dirt coloured seed bug.

5750  Thanks for the help,  we are being invaded in central Kelowna near the downtown core.  The bugs have been covering our buildings and it is hard to keep them out.  They look a little like a boxelder bug but lack the red marks, and they are about 1/8 inch long in the small version with a mostly red body,  and about a quarter inch long or more in the larger version. I really need to get them out of my home and off my door and walls,  please help. Armand

This appears to be a nymph of a bug in the superfamily Lygaeoidea, such as a dirt-coloured seed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Rhyparochromidae). These tend to be nuisance pests that do very little actual harm. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

A strange one

5749   In Ottawa, ON, about 3mm long, swarms of them came out on a hot summer day and running around the concrete/pavers.

I hate to admit it, but this one has me (temporarily, at least) completely bamboozled. It superficially resembles a nymph of a damsel bug (see http://tinyurl.com/hg5ues5 for an example), but I do not know of any damsel bugs having this colour pattern, and being predators, it would be extremely unusual to see large numbers of them in one place. I’ll keep trying… Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Yellowjacket wasp

Yellowjacket wasp

5748  Hi. My name is Sarita.I live in Surrey, BC,. We have a lot of bees (picture attached) in our house. I need your help how we can remove them and their nest. Thanks. Sarita.  Enclosed: indoor pictures of bee.

 This is not a bee.  It is a Yellowjacket wasp.  If you can find the nest and it is easily accessible there are aerosol pesticides that can be sprayed into the nest, but use caution and plan an escape route.  You could also call an experienced pest professional and avoid the risks.   http://pestcontrolcanada.com/british-columbia/surrey

seed bug

dirt-colored seed bug

5747  Location: Beamsville, Ontario.  All of a sudden we have found a large amount of these bugs in our front porch area and entering the home. Mark

This is a dirt-colored seed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Rhyparochromidae); it resembles Raglius alboacuminatus, a European species that has become established in the Pacific Northwest – see http://tinyurl.com/gmqq2g7 for an image. If this is that species, it would represent a significant range extension. You might query the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture (http://tinyurl.com/gn5gmlc) to see if there have been any other similar reports. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Horntail wood wasp

Horntail wood wasp pupa

5746   Hi, this bug is in my firewood. Some just under bark, and some in middle of wood. 

This is a pupa of a wood wasp known as a horntail (Hymenoptera: Siricidae). Their larvae tunnel in the wood of dead/dying trees, where they often fall victim to giant ichneumon wasps in the genus Megarhyssa – See http://tinyurl.com/jahprf2 for details. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

dog-day cicadas or harvestflies

5745  Hello I’m Leo. I found this while sweeping outside my work, and I’ve never seen anything like it. It was HUGE (About the size of a Bic lighter) and wouldn’t fly when nudged. I’m in South Carolina, USA.   Thank you!

This is a cicada (Hemiptera/Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae); it appears to be in the genus Neotibicen. Cicadas in this genus (formerly placed in the genus Tibicen) often are called dog-day cicadas or harvestflies as they emerge from underground late in summer unlike their periodical (13- and 17-year cicadas) cousins. See http://tinyurl.com/nevclj9 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Stink bug

Stink bug nymph

5744   Hi, my name is Ronna. I found this bug in my back yard in Moncton, NB on a hot sunny July day.  What is it?

This is a nymph of a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in the genus Podisus. Bugs in this genus are known as soldier bugs, and as general predators on many other arthropods often are considered beneficial by gardeners. See http://tinyurl.com/hhywusm for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Assassin bug nymph in coffee beans

5743  I found this crawling in my coffee grinder, right after dumping some coffee beans in, so I’m guessing it came from in the bag of beans. At first I wondered if it was a foreign insect that came with the coffee, but that’s not the case since the beans I buy are roasted here in Guelph, Ontario, so any stowaway insects would not still be alive after roasting… so I’m guessing it’s a local critter! Please help me figure out what it is?!  thanks, Andrew

This is indeed a local species; it is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter (Reduvius personatus), a peridomestic species with a wide distribution. See No. 5740 for another example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Marbled Orb Weaver spider

5742   Hello,  My name is Joy and I live in Jemseg, NB.  Encountered this spider in my raspberry patch last evening.
Thanks. 

This is an orb weaving spider in the family Araneidae; it looks like Araneus marmoreus, known as the marbled orb weaver. This species is highly polymorphic, exhibiting a very wide range of individual variation in colour patterns. See http://tinyurl.com/zyq5dmu for more detailed information on this species. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Strange fungus

5741  Hi there.  This “nest” is inside a cottage in Haliburton ontario, any idea what it could be?   Patti

I have never seen anything quite like this before; it does not look like any insect or spider ‘nest’/egg sac or cocoon that I am familiar with. It is possible that it might be a fungal/fungus-like growth of some kind – see http://tinyurl.com/zns3y73 for an example (slime mould). Try cutting into it very carefully with a sharp knife to see what the interior looks like. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Assassin bug

Assassin bug

5740  IDENTIFY WHAT TYPE OF BUG THIS IS PLEASE AND THANK You. I was in Florida a few months back. Is it possible it might have came from the beach? Found it in my laundry room where all the scuba, beach items are kept. Please let me know ASAP Cheers! Debbie

This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter (Reduvius personatus). This is a peridomestic species with a wide distribution, and it does have a reputation for a very painful (but not dangerous) bite; see http://tinyurl.com/23g4bdy for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Giant lichen orb weaver spider

5739   Hi there,  My name is Rebecca. I live in Hammonds Plains, NS. I found this spider on my back deck this morning. It’s a hot, sunny, feels like 27 degrees 8:30am.

This is another orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus; likely Araneus bicentenarius, known as the giant lichen orb weaver – see http://tinyurl.com/jekst4y for an image. This species is widely distributed over the eastern half of North America. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 

Orb Weaving Spider

5738  Could you please identify this spider for me. I have quite a few lurking around. They hide during the day and are only on Web in the early evening and night. Seem harmless enough. Just want to make sure. I think this is his underside

This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus; a specific i.d. is not possible from this view. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 

Scarabe beetle

Scarab beetle

5737   July 23 in Port Glasgow, Ontario About an inch long and flies, what is it?  Tammy

This is a scarab beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in the genus Osmoderma, likely Osmoderma eremicola, known as the hermit flower beetle or leather beetle; see http://tinyurl.com/c69hhjy for additional information on this fascinating insect that I first encountered some 60 years ago on our family farm in North Dakota. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 

dobsonfly male

Male Dobsonfly

5736  Bug for identification please. July 24, 2016. Brant County, Ontario. Lister.

This is a male eastern dobsonfly Corydalus cornutus (Megaloptera: Corydalidae); Their long, forceps-like mandibles apparently are used primarily in courtship, they have little leverage and are incapable of inflicting more than a light pinch to humans skin. On the other hand, the much shorter mandibles of the female (see no. 5735) are very strong, and their bite can draw blood. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 

Dobsonfly

Female Dobsonfly

5735 This photo was taken in Auburn, Ontario. My name is Jason O’Reilly. It landed on my kitchen window and stayed there all night and never moved an inch.

This is a female eastern dobsonfly, Corydalus cornutus (Megaloptera: Corydalidae); their aquatic larvae are known as hellgrammites and often used as fish bait.
See http://tinyurl.com/2ds89l5 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 

 

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