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Bed Bug

Bed Bug

6003  smaller than apple seed.. may 24weekend rural Ontario in an RV..   Thanks in advance.  Brian. 

This is a bed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Cimicidae), but the image is not clear enough to determine whether it is a human bed bug or a closely related species such as a bat bug. See https://tinyurl.com/zawv29f for a very detailed article on bed bugs. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

American carrion beetle

American carrion beetle

6002  I have never seen this beetle here before. Found it on top of my backyard gate post in Ottawa, Ontario in mid May.

This is an American carrion beetle, Necrophila americana (Coleoptera: Silphidae). See https://tinyurl.com/k4u7p3y for images and additional information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

cecropia moth caterpillar

cecropia moth caterpillar

6001    Hi.  This picture was taken on a friend’s farm near Endeavour, Saskatchewan almost 10 years ago. At the time nobody could identify it.   It was found in a recently planted sea buckthorn windbreak row. Never saw one before or since. This guy was kept by the children and fed sea buckthorn leaves until he started spinning a cocoon in his jar. At that point my friend relented and put him back in the sea buckthorn, never to be seen again. As you can see, the critter was a good 10 cm long, and, “not from around here”.   If you can identify it you will solve a ten-year mystery.  Thanks, George

This is a caterpillar of a cecropia moth, Hyalophora cecropia (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae), North America’s largest moth. See https://tinyurl.com/ya29g8d5 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Grain weevil

Grain weevil

6000   Hi, I was finally able to get a good picture of the bugs that were in the rental we moved into .   You mentioned that they were most likely weevils but the pics were blurry … would you mind looking at this pic and , if possible , narrowing down the type ??  Thanks again for your time.

This does indeed look like one of the grain/granary weevils in the genus Sitophilus, see http://tinyurl.com/hl8fkt9 for an example. You should check all food storage areas where you keep dry food items (including bird seed), especially seeds of wheat, rice, or corn (maize), for signs of infestation.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Mayfly

Mayfly

5999   Could you please help in identifying this insect. I have swarms of them around my house, the cover everything from my BBQ, my table to my car.

This is a male mayfly (order Ephemeroptera). These do not feed as adults or otherwise cause any physical damage, but can become extreme nuisances when large swarms of them emerge at the same time. Mayflies spend the vast majority of their lives as aquatic nymphs; the adults live only long enough to find mates and then deposit their eggs. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

terrestrial crustacean (sow bug)

terrestrial crustacean (sow bug)

5998   Hello!    My name is Travis, and I live in southern Ontario.  We’ve seen a few of these guys in our master bathroom in the past few days and would love an identification.  I hope the photo is clear enough.  My best guess is some kind of sowbug?     They are small (maybe as long as my fingernail, <1cm).  It’s just the beginning of spring and it’s starting to get warm.    I hope I’ve given adequate info.  Thanks!  Travis

This is a terrestrial crustacean in the order Isopoda, and sowbug is one of the common names applied to these creatures. They primarily are scavengers on bits of decomposing organic matter, but some species have been known to damage very tender plant parts. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

reproductive caste termite

Reproductive caste termite

5997      can you tell me what this bug is?    Thank you.   Jackie 

This is a reproductive caste termite. You may wish to have your premises inspected by a professional termite control company. See http://tinyurl.com/z6nhap8 elsewhere on this site for a directory of professional concerns in Canada. If you live in the United States, see http://tinyurl.com/ddsa37 for a starting point.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

assassin bug

assassin bug

5996   Can you please tell me what is this bug?  Hang Ha

This appears to be a nymph of Reduvius personatus, a peridomestic species of assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter. These are reported as having a very painful but not dangerous bite. See http://tinyurl.com/23g4bdy for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

fairy shrimp crustacean

fairy shrimp crustacean

5995  My name is Bailey and live in northern Alberta, I found this little guy in the swamp out back. Not too sure if it’s a larvae or what.  anyone know??

This is a crustacean known as a fairy shrimp (class Branchiopoda; order Anostraca). I often encountered these in temporary pools in the early spring on our farm in North Dakota. See http://tinyurl.com/l8mgqq8 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

larder beetle

larder beetle

5994    Hey just wondering what kind of beetle this is. Found it under the bathroom sink with about 15 more. Lots of sawdust and wood around them. I looked on the site to see if it was posted and couldn’t find one like it.

This is a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), a peridomestic pest species. See http://tinyurl.com/nw92wz for more detailed information, including control recommendations.

Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Dog tick

Dog Tick

5993  Good Morning.   I went for a walk in some grassland with a few trees here and there, not far from a beachy area on Lake Ontario and since then have found several of the bugs that you can see in the attached photo.   They don’t bite or anything but seem to hook themselves on to your skin and are not easily swiped off. They are also “unsquashable” so must have a very tough shell –  the only way I have been able to kill them is by flushing them down the toilet.   My dog was with me on the walk but does not appear to have any on him and I’m wondering where they are coming from ….and why they seem to like me so much!!! – I also live on a marina so my home is right by water…is this the connection?  Please let me know what they are and how to best get rid of them. There are not loads but it’s a bit disconcerting finding them periodically attached to me (and my daughter)   Thanks   Sue

This is a female dog tick.   They can be a health hazard if they bite.   They should be removed quickly.  It is quite likely your dog has ticks that should be removed. 
More Info:  http://www.wallisroughley.ca/ticksurveillance.html

Maggot (fly larva)

5992   Dear Pest Control Canada,    I’ve been finding these little white maggot-like things all over the kitchen floor and occasionally on the counters, but I can’t figure out where they are actually coming from.  They don’t really crawl…they seem to start crawling but then just sort of roll and wriggle and don’t get very far, which is confusing as they keep appearing in the middle of the floor with no discernable source.  They’ve just started in the past few days as it’s finally gotten sunny here in Vancouver, BC.  Do you have any idea what they could be?
Thank you and sincerely,  Shoshana
This appears to be a maggot (fly larva).    They could be dropping from your ceiling through gaps around a light fixture or ceiling fan.  They may be feeding on a dead rodent in your attic.  This is not an uncommon pest problem. 

 

Cockroach

Cockroach

5991   Found this little guy dead in my kitchen any idea what it is? Thanks kind regards, Rhys Jonah

This is a cockroach, but it does not appear to be any of the common peridomestic pest species. Knowing your geographic rea would help on pinning it down. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

plant louse

plant louse

5990  Is this a baby bed bug?

This is an aphid, aka ‘plant louse’ (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). All aphids are sap feeders, and some can be serious garden/agricultural pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Firefly larva

Firefly larva

5989   Found this today in the Belleville area! What is it?!?   Jenn

This appears to be a larva of a firefly (Coleoptera: Lampyridae); see http://tinyurl.com/lv3whqt for an image. They are general predators on other small arthropods, mainly other insects. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

drugstore beetles

drugstore beetles

5988  These little bugs showed up in our Kitchen late last summer 2016. They are mainly in the kitchen cupboards and often migrate to the south facing windows. They disappeared once the cold weather come around even though they are in the house. In the middle of April 2017  they started showing up again.  I would like to know what they are so that we can figure out how to get rid of them.  We are located in Napanee Ontario Canada.   Harold

These look like drugstore beetles, Stegobium paniceum (Coleoptera: Anobiidae). They and their close relatives, cigarette beetles (Lasioderma serricorne), are cosmopolitan pests that will infest a very wide range of organic materials. See http://tinyurl.com/psebz98 for more detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

duff millipede

duff millipede

5987      Hi there,  I am Mel who lives in Vancouver, BC.  I have attached a photo of a bug for identification.  The bug’s are located inside the basement, on the west facing window sills.  The bugs were noticed in January 2017 and they are still in the basement.  There has been more rain than usual and the area around the house has been very wet.   Thanks for your assistance.

– This is a duff millipede (Polyxenida: Polyxenidae). These are merely nuisance pests; no need for control measures. See http://tinyurl.com/mrd7qq6 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

larvae of a crane fly

larvae of a crane fly

5986  Good afternoon,  My name is Rebeca and we leave in London , Ontario.  Yesterday morning, we noticed our driveway infested with these larvae. Could you please help us to identify them? They are around 0.6 inches long.  Thanks.

These look like larvae of a crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae); see http://tinyurl.com/mz8ad2m for an example. These usually are found in damp to wet soils, and some species can be turf pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

soldier beetle

soldier beetle

5985   This was taken outside, Maple Ridge B.C.  April 30 2017.   Ken

This looks like a soldier beetle (Coleoptera: Cantharidae) in the genus Podabrus; see http://tinyurl.com/l4oglbu for an example. For the most part, these appear to be general predators on other small arthropods as well as acting as pollinators. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Australian cockroach nymph

Australian cockroach nymph

5984    Hi,    I’m writing in relation to a dead bug I found in my bedroom that is about 1 inch in size. I can’t tell what it is…  Many thanks,  Jessica

This appears to be a nymph of an Australian cockroach, Periplaneta australasiae (Blattodea: Blattidae). See http://tinyurl.com/ka4ltgr for details on its life history as well as some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

giant water bug

giant water bug

5983  I found my son playing with this insect in the school’s playground sandbox. It is really big, at least 3″ long. Found in Trenton, Ontario end April.  What is it and does it bite? Thanks!

This is a giant water bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Belostomatidae); likely in the genus Lethocerus. These are general predators on other aquatic life forms, primarily other arthropods, but sometimes small minnows, tadpoles, etc. as well. They can inflict a very painful ‘bite’ (more of a stab) with their powerful beak. See http://tinyurl.com/k84ft2m for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

house centipede

house centipede

5982   Hello,   My name is Matt and I found this bug in our washroom, located in Richmond hill Ontario. I find smaller versions of these bugs frequently. Do you know what it is? 

This is a house centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata, a cosmopolitan species. Unlike most other centipedes, house centipedes have quite good eyesight, and can hunt down their prey. Finding numbers of these usually is indicative of the presence of other insects. They also are capable of inflicting a painful (but not dangerous) bite. See http://tinyurl.com/mn7mzf for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Carpet beetle?

Carpet beetle?

5981   Hello,   I was lying in bed when I felt something tickling and moving along the side of my belly. The attached pictures are of what I am hoping is just a beetle.  The insect is tiny, approximately 3 mm long.  I flipped it on its back for one of the pictures.  I live in Boucherville, Quebec, and this was taken April 22, 2017.  Regards,  Patrick

This is a beetle, but unfortunately, I cannot tell much more from this image. The only ones having this general appearance that would be of any concern are carpet beetles. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

firebug

Firebug

5980  I have been seeing this particular black and fire red insect around my home and my community. It has destroyed/eaten all my plants and I cannot seem to  do anything to get rid of them.  Can you tell me what this bug is and if it  is harmful to have inside my Home or is it dangerous in any other way? I  have a small toddler who likes to play in the rocks but my rocks are filled  with hundreds of these bugs.

This is a firebug, Pyrrhocoris apterus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pyrrhocoridae). Something else likely is destroying your plants, as these insects reportedly feed primarily on seeds of members of the mallow and lime families – see http://tinyurl.com/kdbrpn8. They tend to form dense aggregations in the spring, and a person seeing those could presume that they were causing damage. They also pose no danger to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Female and male ants

Female and male ants

5979  Hi there,  I was hoping you could help me identify these bugs I found congregating around the deck in our backyard. I live in East York, Ontario and only noticed these yesterday.

These are ants, the black ones are males and the larger brown one is a female. I am unsure as to the species, but at least they do not appear to be carpenter ants. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Adelgid nymph

Adelgid nymph

5978  My name is Luke. Location: Kelowna, BC.  At a home surrounded by fur and pine trees, the argentine ants have taken over the area and foraging at all these trees. They are coming down from the tee with this creature in their mouth. I think it’s an adelgid, but I’m not a pro, and I want to know what exactly has allowed these ants to thrive in such a different forest than their native origin.

This does look like a nymph of an adelgid – see http://tinyurl.com/lh7o7sn for an example. Argentine ants have been very successful in expanding their range as they tend to form ‘supercolonies’, each having multiple queens, and the colonies cooperate rather than compete with each other. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Stonefly

Stonefly

5977   My name – Debbie.  These bugs are showing up in the Spring time on the outside of the house.
I am located in Grand Forks, BC Canada

This is a stonefly (order Plecoptera). Their larvae form an important part of the freshwater food web; see http://tinyurl.com/h84682mfor detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

cave/camel cricket

Cave /camel cricket

5976   Hi,  We found this in Harrison Hot Springs, BC, Canada in April. It was in a wet cave on the ceiling with dozens of other ones. The cave was in a forest at about 120m elevation. The largest had bodies about 2-3 inches long.  John

This is a cave/camel cricket (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae); they commonly are found in damp, dark, seldom-disturbed habitats, Some in the genus Tropidischia (see http://tinyurl.com/k9bkwob  for an example) can get quite large. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Ichneumonid wasp

Ichneumonid wasp

5975    Hi, thanks for the great site.  We had this little visitor crawling out from under the cabinet in our bathroom on the second floor of our home in Calgary, Alberta on the 14th of April.  We have had some great spring weather leading up to this week, but it has turned cold (complete with some spring snow yesterday).  We have had some unscreened windows open in the house already.  Our home is 60 years old.  The first concern was termite or carpenter ant.  I think the wings are maybe too short for a termite.  But maybe an ant?  Hopefully not a carpenter.  Regardless, it is a truly magnificent creature.  Thank you so much for your time!  -Glenn

This is a wasp in the family Ichneumonidae. All ichneumonid wasps are parasitic on other arthropods, mainly other insects, and are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

German cockroach

German Cockroach

5974   Geographical Location: Markham, ON.  Bug was collected in the kitchen. Over the last month or so, we have been waking up to them of varying sizes between 0.5 cm to 2 cm (this one was about 1.5 cm) in length, not including their antennae. They are typically crawling on the kitchen counter (granite) but can also be seen on the floor, or on vertical surfaces (dishwasher door, cupboard doors, etc.) It is currently April and weather conditions are mild, between 5 to 10 C. Snow is melting, and it has been relatively damp over the last few days, but weather in the month since their infestation has been fluctuating. It looks as if they have wings and they are capable of climbing glass jars. We have been rigorously cleaning and cannot find a way to get rid of them. Suggestions would be gratefully accepted!   Thanks for your help!  David.

This is a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), a very common and widespread pest species that can be difficult to bring under compete control. See http://tinyurl.com/h3nd9z8 elsewhere on this site for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Varied carpet beetle

Varied carpet beetle

5973   Hi there,    I reside in the city of Coquitlam, in the province of British Columbia, Canada. I own a larger house, approximately 5 years old and just in the last 2 months, found these little guys on the window curtains and bed sheets. They are quite small (3.5 to 4 mm) and I’ve never found in groups, always found solo. Here in metro Vancouver, it rains fairly hard during January to April and we usually experience mild winter. What is this and is this something I should be concerned about? Thank you very much for your assistance! Hally 

This looks like a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Anthrenus, such as the varied carpet beetle, A. verbasci. See http://tinyurl.com/hz44zxx for images and detailed information on this species and http://tinyurl.com/zl9w25c elsewhere on this site for some control recommendations. These beetles often are found at windows as they attempt to get outdoors; they primarily are pollen feeders, unlike their destructive larvae. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Assassin bug nymph

Assassin bug nymph

5972   My name is Wendy. I live in Montreal and this bug was on my newly carpeted stairs inside my house. It was fairly large, about 3/4 of an inch.

This appears to be a nymph of Reduvius personatus, a peridomestic species of assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter. These are reported as having a very painful but not dangerous bite. See http://tinyurl.com/23g4bdy for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Non-biting midge

Non-biting midge

5971  These bugs appeared today in the thousands on our deck and screen door. Temperature here today reached 18C. Very small about 3 or 4mm. Hope you can identify them. Our location is Campbellford, Ontario and we are on the Trent River.

This is a non-biting midge (Diptera: Chironomidae)l see http://tinyurl.com/mpx96u3 for an image. These are close relatives of mosquitoes, and like them, their larvae are aquatic. Although harmless, these insects can occur in large numbers and make terrible nuisances of themselves.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Parasitic fly

Parasitic fly

5970  I reside in the Roodepoort area in Gauteng Province of South Africa and I wondered if you can shed some light on the subject of this kind of fly, it is not one of the more common flies in our area.  It is late Autumn 10 April 2017 so it is not yet cold. It came flying in to the house late evening, it doesn’t fly very fast.  It is 13mm from the tip of the wing to the tip of it head.  Green eyes.  The body is yellowish red-brown in colour. Thank you for the opportunity to find out what kind of fly this is.  Kind regards,  Samantha 

This fly looks like something in the family Tachinidae, but I cannot offer a more specific identification. All flies in this family are parasitic on other arthropods, mainly other insects. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Firebrat

Firebrat

5969   Hi, thank you for this great site.  I noticed this little critter in the bathroom sink of our clean, 3rd floor apartment in Winnipeg about a month after moving in. I’ve never seen something like this in our old house, and was wondering if this was a baby cockroach, silverfish, or something else? If it wasn’t already here, it’s possible it came in with some of our old stuff which had been stored in a clean basement that did suffer from some groundwater seepage, where the occasional sow bug could be seen.  Thanks so much for your time!  -Adam

This is a firebrat (Thermobia domestica; Zygentoma: Lepismatidae). These are cosmopolitan in distribution and along with their close cousins, silverfish, basically are nuisance pests that seldom cause real harm. See http://tinyurl.com/mc5vk7j for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

darkling beetle

darkling beetle

5968 Dear Sirs,  My name is Mellissa and I live in Jamaica. A cemetery is nearby and the house is in between two open lots with mostly shrubs. Our yard has grass and some fruit trees. We also use soak-away pits/cesspools that allow water to absorbed into the earth. There is also a shed in the back yard that was once a haven for cockroaches. Is is sunny all year round here with rainy and dry seasons – the bugs are here irrespective. These bugs/beetles come out in the night through small spaces in our windows, in the daytime there in minimal movement and sometimes they appear dead when they are not. They are about a quarter of an inch long, black, have six legs and a set of antlers/feelers. They have a semi-hard exoskeleton and if you step on one you can hear it crack. They are quite a pest and I would like to know what they are and what they exist to do. Please let me know if you need any further information.   Thank you

This might be a darkling beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), but I cannot see enough detail (particularly its tarsal segments) to be certain. Although these may be nuisances, at least it does not appear to be any of the common pest species in that family. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil

broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil

5967   Please, please help me identify these bugs [Beetles ? ] that I am finding in my house. I live North of Toronto in Stouffville Ontario. It is early April and I have been finding them in all different places. Such as walls, floors, countertops etc.,  I have attached pictures. I should mention that they are slow moving, Again please help as I am grossed out with them. Thank you so much.

This is a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae), possibly a black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus  – see http://tinyurl.com/lgr7rzr for an image. Indoors, these simply are nuisance pests that cause no harm. However, they can be serious pests outdoors, especially in their larval stage – see http://tinyurl.com/monvaej for detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Dermestidae beetle

Larder beetle

99% of these insects are smaller than a flaxseed & bigger than window screen. Westwold, BC first year ever seen and first time in house! Inside only on all window sills. Three year old windows. These insects fly. Not in furniture. Not on occupants or pets. They fly. No bites. Maybe coming in window sill drain holes. All vacuumed up and taken out outside only to have more appearing minutes later. Two weeks now and seem to be less and less.

This is a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/larder/hide/skin beetles and relatives). You should check all your food storage areas as well as any organic fabrics (wool, silk, those trimmed with fur or feathers, etc.) in long-term storage and any wool rugs for signs of insect infestation.  See http://tinyurl.com/zl9w25c elsewhere on this site for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

wasp nest dermestid

Dermestidae (Carpet) beetle

5965  Hi there, I was wondering if you could tell me if this is a carpet beetle or a bed bud. The antenna and legs made me think it was a bedbug when I was looking at Google images , but when going through you photos I questioned if it was a carpet beetle or something in that family. It does not have the characteristic ridges & colors from what I seen bed bugs typically have. It is black or really dark brown. Any help or insight you could give me would I would be incredibly appreciative. I have seen two of these in the past 12 hours.

This is a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/skin/hide/larder beetles and allies); it looks like Reesa vespulae, known as the wasp nest dermestid. These beetles feed on dead insects, various stored seeds and dried plant material; they also may be found outdoors in bird and wasp nests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Northern Black Widow spider

Northern Black Widow spider

5964   2.5 inches long looks like black widow hybrid. John.  Kelowna, BC.

This appears to be a northern black widow spider, Latrodectus variolus. These often have a median red stripe or series of red dots on the dorsum of their abdomen in addition to the ‘hourglass’ on the ventral aspect – see http://tinyurl.com/k3doxlu.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Camel/Cave cricket

Camel/Cave cricket

5963   Hi, I’m Mark in Ottawa.  Over the past few days (April 2-3 2017), I’ve found these bugs in my basement at night, near my sump pit. I killed 2 last night, but I found (and killed) 3 tonight (including the one in picture). It unfortunately looks like a type of cockroach, but the color doesn’t match a German one. Please tell me I am wrong. never had these EVER…crossing my fingers!!!  Mark

This is a camel/cave cricket (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae); see http://tinyurl.com/l62qhkjor an example. They often are found in damp, dark environments such as caves, basements, under logs, etc. and basically are nuisance pests that seldom cause any real harm. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

running crab spider

running crab spider

5962   I found this little dude in my room and (s)he’s been hanging out on the far wall for the past four days. Despite my phobia, Ive tried to be kind and leave them be but I’m curious to know more about my little roomie. I live in Red Deer, Alberta and it is currently April 4th.

This looks like a running crab spider (family Philodromidae); they are completely harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Fungus gnat larvae

Fungus gnat larvae

5961   I found these clumps of larvae in my backyard in Sylvan Lake, Alberta as the snow was melting now in April 2017. There are at least 2 dozen clumps of larvae often with a larger reddish worm nearby. We have a dog but the larvae weren’t even near any of the stool piles that we missed picking up throughout the winter. So I’m really hoping they aren’t pin worms and maybe just earthworm larvae that had to surface due to the excessive moisture in the ground. The yard doesn’t see much sun and with all the snow it becomes like a glacier in spring. Can’t find any photos like it and we have lived here for 15 years and have never experienced this before. Sure would like to know what they are…Tanis

These appear to be larvae of a fungus gnat (Diptera: Sciaridae), see http://tinyurl.com/l8xa3v6for an image. These likely were feeding either on decaying dead grass or on fungus that was decomposing the grass. Basically nuisance pests.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Bumble or carpenter bee

Bumble or carpenter bee

5960   I live in Modesto, California it is gloomy outside, I found this bug in my driveway this morning it was on its back moving his 4 legs like it was trying to overturn itself. I left it alone 6 hours later I go check on it and turned it over with A stick it has stripes like a bumble been and small wings on its back. I sprayed it with raid and it died. I put it in a jar I need to know what it is and should I be concerned I have small puppies.  Ellena

This is either a bumble bee (Bombus sp.) or a carpenter bee (Xylocopa sp.); the condition of your specimen makes it very difficult to be certain. Regardless, neither bee poses any threat; they are not aggressive and will sting only if severely molested. They also are valuable pollinators.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

tanbark borer

tanbark borer

5959  We have had a couple of these bugs flying in our house. They are not very good flyers. No idea where they are coming from. Any assistance would be appreciated. I am in Burlington, Ontario.  Liz

This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera; Cerambycidae); it looks like Phymatodes testaceus, known as the tanbark borer – see http://tinyurl.com/m349ves for an image (note: this species is quite variable in appearance) and more information. These will not infest anything in your home, and there is no need for control. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

male fishing spider

male fishing spider

5958 Hello,  Last August we moved from Nashville Tennessee. Before we left, the apartment complex had an infestation of brown recluse spiders, so I wanted to play it on the safe side and ask to see if we are dealing with them 10 months after moving.  Please let me know what you think and if we need to take any further measures. Sincerely, Greg Frost

No worries here – this is a male fishing spider (family Pisauridae), likely Dolomedes triton; see http://tinyurl.com/lwo3w2t for an image. These are active hunters that do not spin a capture web, and pose no threat to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

carpet beetle

carpet beetle

5957   Please help!  I’m finding this bug creeping along usually on fabric / furniture / carpet. Not really in kitchen or bathroom.   It’s about a little bigger than a fleck of pepper or so. Only find one at a time, never in a group – maybe see one every week or so. The body doesnt appear jointed. And the pix that looks like it has wings.  Never seen them fly. Location: apartment in Toronto, Ontario.  Have only noticed them recently, say, since October-ish. Noticed one this evening crawling on my cat as she slept!!!  Would love to know how to get rid of them.  Your help in identifying is greatly appreciated. Nancy

This looks like a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), possibly in the genus Attagenus – see http://tinyurl.com/hngt3cj for an example. Check around the margins of your carpeting as well as any fabrics containing wool or silk to see if you can find any larvae that look like this: http://tinyurl.com/hr3qzn5. If you do, see http://tinyurl.com/zl9w25c elsewhere on this site for some control advice. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

scarlet malachite beetle larva

scarlet malachite beetle larva

5956  Hi, my name is Tara, this is a photo of an insect that I have found in my house not once, but three times within a week. I live in Edmonton, AB, and have seen nothing like this before. Twice they have been found crawling on the carpet, and once in my lunch bag! Odd thing is, the times I found them on the carpet were both upstairs on the second floor, whereas my lunch bag always remains on the first floor on top of the kitchen island, or within a cupboard. They do not die when you put them in water, and are about the size of 1cm and move fairly slow (relative to the fast crawling of spiders). This is in March, when the weather is warming up, and almost rainy. Any help would be appreciated, I really have no idea where I may have gotten these buggers.

This is a larva of a scarlet malachite beetle, Malachius aeneus (Coleoptera: Melyridae) – see http://tinyurl.com/khegf6s for detailed information. This is not a pest, but simply an accidental intruder that will do no harm. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Hibernating Box Elder bug

Hibernating Box Elder bug

5955  Hello sir..   I found these bugs all around my house located in Stittsville Ontario.    I found it last time in my daughter hair.. I need to get rid of it as soon as possible cause maybe it will hurt my babies ..   Thanks

This is a box elder bug.  They are common in your area as they seek shelter in the fall to hibernate over the winter.  They can be a nuisance but are harmless.  Read more about box elder bugs.

winter stonefly

winter stonefly

5954   Howdy, thanks for helping ID this critter.  Found numerous specimens today on the crushed ice on rivers edge.  South Saskatchewan River near Empress, Alberta.  Owen.

 

This appears to be a winter stonefly (Plecoptera: Taeniopterygidae), so called because the adults often emerge during very late winter/early spring while snow still is on the ground. See http://tinyurl.com/mv5y8yofor more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Other photo id pages. (click number above)