See also:  Spider categorized species photos
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Wood wasp

6057 Wood wasp

6057   Hi, Quinten here. This was flying around our backyard today….Live in Kamloops, BC

This is a wood wasp (also known as a horntail), Hymenoptera: Siricidae; specifically, it is Urocerus flavicornis. These are harmless to humans; what appears to be a stinger is its ovipositor, used to place its eggs in wood (usually pines) where their larvae develop – see https://tinyurl.com/yakkgfom for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

clear-winged moths

clear-winged moths

6056   I live in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. This photo was recently taken in June 2017 at our local community garden. We have never seen this insect in our garden before. It could be found resting on the leaves of potatoes as well as Shasta Daisies. It looks like a type of wasp, yet we would appreciate having it identified, and also if it is destructive or aggressive. It seemed to be passively resting both times we have seen it. Thank you. Linda

These are clear-winged moths (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae); many species are excellent wasp mimics. Their larvae all are borers in plant tissues, and some, like the peach tree borer, can be serious pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

redheaded ash borers

redheaded ash borers

6055   Have a pile of logs from a recently cut down tree and saw these bugs on it that looks like wasps from a distance but up close they were more like crickets.

This is a mating pair (the male is the smaller of the two) of redheaded ash borers, Neoclytus acuminatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). See https://tinyurl.com/k8j27rp for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

jumping spider

jumping spider

6054  My name is Barbara and I live outside of Maders Cove in Nova Scotia.   Four days ago (June 8th) I found this insect on the upholstered headboard of my bed. It has the ability to jump and is 5-6mm in length.  I saw an exact one a few days later in my clear tube bird feeder. After a very bad bite on my neck a week ago I am wondering if it could have come from this insect.  thank you for your work,  Barbara

This is a jumping spider (family Salticidae); it would be very unlikely for it to have bitten you. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

wharf borer

wharf borer

6053   This bug is fairly small. Hopefully you can help us identify it. My name is Kat and I’m in Winnipeg, Mb, Canada. Thanks!

This looks like wharf borer, Narcerdes melanura (Coleoptera: Oedemeridae). See https://tinyurl.com/obonjsx for an image and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

tussock moth

Tussock moth caterpillar

6052  I don’t know if this is a pest or not but I didn’t want to kill it if it is! Found on raspberry bushes in Calgary, AB on June 20, 2017. Does not seem to be eating the raspberry leaves. May have fallen from nearby apple or spruce. This caterpillar is about 1.5cm long and maybe 3mm wide. It has a tuft on its rear end and the 4 white spots are actually tufts also. I have ruled out a white satin moth but have no idea what else it could be. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Melissa

This is a caterpillar of a tussock moth in the genus Orgyia – some of their body hairs reportedly can cause an irritating rash on tender skin.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Fly Larva ?????

Fly Larva ?????????????

6051   Found this in my dry cleaning shirt. I put it on and few minutes later I realized something bothering me in the back. Took off my shirt and found this. And now I have a what feels like a bite or so…redness…  Ben

 I’m not really sure what this might be – it resembles a fly larva (maggot), but a dry-cleaned shirt would seem to be an unusual place for one of these to be found. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Stink bug

Stink bug

6050  Toronto, our home backs onto the Rouge Park ravine. This little guy was on our sliding glass door. Bonnie

This is a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae); it appears to be the species Banasa dimidiata  see https://tinyurl.com/ycgkje77 for an image and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Mayfly

Mayfly

6049  Calgary, Alberta, Canada June 08. Has 3 things out its tail, I know it’s not a pest but I’m curious what it is. Thanks,  Braedon 

This is a mayfly (order Ephemeroptera); possibly a subimago that recently has emerged from its naiad (immature) ‘skin.’ If so, it will molt once more to reach the adult (imago) stage. Mayflies are the only insects known to shed their ‘skin’ after attaining the winged stage. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

metallic wood-boring beetle

metallic wood-boring beetle

6048    Beetle found on a hot day early June, Barrie, Ontario, very good flyer, shimmery copper belly.   Carolyn

This is a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), possibly in the genus Chalcophora; see https://tinyurl.com/ybeug8rl for an example. Larvae of these beetles are known as flat-headed wood borers, and make characteristic oval-shaped tunnels in wood. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Stonefly

Stonefly

6047    We live in Edmonton, Alberta and have lived at location for 25 years and have never seen this Insect before (found 4 in the last 3 days).  We live on the edge of the city with the North Saskatchewan River across the street. The insects have only been seen towards evening. One at dusk and the other 3 late evening (total darkness).  I’ve tried my own searches but can’t find anything similar. My main concern is if they bite !!!  Any information you can provide would be much appreciated.  Thank you,  Shauna

This is a stonefly (order Plecoptera). Their larvae form an important part of the freshwater food web; see http://tinyurl.com/h84682mfor detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

jumping spider

6047   Found this today and people are freaking me out telling me it maybe venomous.   I just want to be sure it’s not.  Thank you!  Makakita.

This is Phidippus audax, a very common and widespread species of jumping spider (family Salticidae) known as the bold or daring jumper. Like the vast majority of spiders, it has venom glands and therefore can be considered venomous. However, these are not at all dangerous to humans. See https://tinyurl.com/yaxwjyp8 for images and much more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Aphid (plant louse)

Aphid (plant louse)

6046  I recently found these bugs on the new growth of our Mugo Pine here in Calgary. These bugs always appear surrounded by a number of ants and are about 3mm long.    Thank you,  Tom

This is an aphid, also known as a plant louse (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). When feeding, they often secrete a sticky fluid called honeydew; some species of ants are attracted to this substance and will appear to guard the aphids against other predatory/parasitic insects. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

firefly

firefly

6045    Hello, I am from Ottawa Ontario Canada and I have been finding these bugs in my back yard, they seem to be growing in numbers and I would like to know what they are called. I have never seen these bugs before and I would like to know more about them. Thank you.

This is a firefly (Coleoptera: Lampyridae); it looks like Lucidota atra, known as the black firefly. See https://tinyurl.com/y7j963c7 for an image and more information on fireflies in general. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

wharf borer

wharf borer

6044   Hi can you please identify this bug. Found two or three in the last couple of days. Worried about it being a cockroach. Thanking you. 

This appears to be a wharf borer, Narcerdes melanura (Coleoptera: Oedemeridae). See https://tinyurl.com/obonjsx for an image and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

horsebean longhorn beetle

horsebean longhorn beetle

6043  This bug flew in over our patio table while we were having a conversation. We live in the Phoenix Arizona area and have never seen an insect like this ever before. Do you have any idea what this is?  Thanks, Adam

This is a horsebean longhorn beetle, Trachyderes mandibularis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). See https://tinyurl.com/yc3petgs for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

thread-waisted wasp

Mud dauber wasp

6041  Geographical location: Calgary, Alberta.   Relevant information: Found indoors [top floor of a condominium unit]  Season: Summer, warm and sunny weather.  Insect size: ¾ of an inch to 1 ½ inches [found in our condo last summer and this summer, starting in the month of June each year)  The insects NEVER go further into our unit than the bedroom and appear to die shortly after coming into our bedroom—they rarely fly around, and are often found of the floor beside our large bedroom windows. We have no idea how they are getting into the unit (windows are well sealed and these insects are BIG—but they may be coming in through our air ventilation vents, and perhaps this journey into the building and into our unit is what caused them to die to quickly after entering). Any identification information which can be provided would be greatly appreciated; I believe it’s a parasitic wasp (a beneficial ‘pest’), but I of course could be wrong!   Thanks in advance,  Michelle

This is a thread-waisted wasp (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) in the genus Sceliphron; it might be S. caementarium, known as the black and yellow mud dauber. See https://tinyurl.com/q9ldqnb for an image and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

tortoise beetle

tortoise beetle

6040   I found this bug clinging to the patio screen door from the inside.    It has wings and when it was upside down it opened its wings to turn  itself around. It appears to have a clear scan like outer shell.   Please advise on what this is. Thank you.   Lisa,  Woodstock,Ontario 

This is a tortoise beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae; subfamily Cassidinae). It appears to be Plagiometriona clavata, known as the clavate tortoise beetle; see https://tinyurl.com/2emdkpo for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Aphid

Aphid

6039   There are lots of these bugs all over our cedar deck and wood patio door trim. A couple days ago they were a pale lime green and now they look like this. Not sure if they are termites or not. Also, the pine tree over the deck has seemed to spray down some sap over the past couple weeks not sure if that is related. We live in Toronto, Canada. 

This is an aphid, also known as a plant louse (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). When feeding, they often secrete a sticky fluid called honeydew; this might be the ‘sap spray’ that you noticed. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

assassin bug

Masked hunter bug bite

6038     Hello, I am located in Scarbrough Ontario. This bug bit me in my bed . It stung so bad it felt like razor blades for about 5 min. After it bit me it flipped over and was stunned on its back . I don’t see it on any Canadian bug charts or your charts. Should I be concerned? Is it a kissing bug?   What should I do?

This is an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter (Reduvius personata). These are reported as having a very painful but not dangerous bite (they do not vector any human pathogens). See http://tinyurl.com/23g4bdy for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

cockroach nymph

cockroach nymph

6037  Can you help me ID these 2 pests in my home. Stouffville, ON

This is a cockroach nymph, but it does not look like any of the common peridomestic pest species. It might be one the so-called wood cockroaches. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

This is a cockroach nymph, but it does not look like any of the common peridomestic pest species. It might be one the so-called wood cockroaches. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

This is a cockroach nymph, but it does not look like any of the common peridomestic pest species. It might be one of the so-called wood cockroaches. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

darkling beetle

darkling beetle

6036  Hey there, I am from the Cowichan Valley in BC and have just tonight found around 10 of these beetles in my house. They are black, not particularly shiny, quite rounded body with 3 defined segments. They’re all about an inch long or so.  I usually wouldn’t think much of seeing a bug or two get in, being raised around wildlife and forests and all that, but I thought seeing this volume of the exact same size and type of bug in one night might be cause for concern. We first saw in the bathroom, then bedroom and spare room when checking corners and around some laundry. We found a couple dead ones too which were likely stomped by accident. We are pretty clean folk and our place is newly renovated. We only just moved in about 2 months ago. My hope, based on other photos on this site, is that this is just happenstance and they came in as babies on the load of wood I brought in the other day and aren’t pests. I haven’t been able to see an exact match so I’m hoping for help here! I hate creepy crawlers and the fact we keep finding these is going to make it hard to sleep! Thanks! Jane

This is a darkling beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), it resembles Eleodes pimelioides; see https://tinyurl.com/y7hwfl9q for an image. The larvae of these beetles are known as false wireworms, and feed on the roots of grasses. The adults are harmless nuisance pests.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

yellow Douglas fir borer

yellow Douglas fir borer

6035   This guy was hanging out under the edge of our kitchen counter, near our dishwasher. Interior BC, late spring.

This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); it looks like Centrodera dayi, known as the yellow Douglas fir borer – see https://tinyurl.com/ybmvqaha for an image.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

plant bug in the family Miridae

plant bug in the family Miridae

6034   Hi. Could you help me identify this bug? I found it dead in my daughters room, at the same time we are trying to figure out what caused bites on her arm. Do you think it’s a bed bug?? It’s about 1-2 mm long. Thank you!  Jackie

This appears to be a plant bug in the family Miridae (see https://tinyurl.com/yc7txyxe for an example), and as such, extremely unlikely to be the source of any bites.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

ground spider

ground spider

6033  Found in a house Canada. Found several of these in our home it’s June here. Fell from ceiling. Bobbiejoe.

This is a ground spider (family Gnaphosidae) in the genus Sergiolus. It appears to be similar to S. montanus (see https://tinyurl.com/yc7txyxe), but confirmation would require microscopic examination of certain body parts.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Sow bugs in cottage

Sow bugs in cottage

6032   Hi – we have a vacation home in Nova Scotia directly on the Bay of Fundy.  These came crawling up the basement foundation and now a few have made their way to the first floor of the house.  Help!

This is a sow bug. They can only survive in damp conditions. Read more about controlling them here: http://pestcontrolcanada.com/sow-bugs-pill-bugs

Ladybug larva

Ladybug larva

6031  From Kingston Ontario. Never seen one of these before. What is it?  Yara 

This is a ladybug larva. The ladybug life cycle is not much different from the life cycle of a butterfly. The ladybug goes through the same four stages as a butterfly, the egg stage, the larvae stage, the pupa stage, and the adult ladybug stage. More information here:
http://www.ladybug-life-cycle.com

 

Nuttall’s blister beetle

Nuttall’s blister beetle

6030  No idea what this is and tried googling for awhile, photo taken in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Canada.  Eddie.

This appears to be a Nuttall’s blister beetle, Lytta nuttalli (Coleoptera: Meloidae); see https://tinyurl.com/yag58ncl for images. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Fungal growth on stump

Fungal growth on stump

6029   Do you know how I can ID these eggs on my dead stump in Ottawa?  Thanks.  Wayne

I suspect that this more likely is a fungal growth of some kind rather than an egg mass of an insect or other invertebrate; see https://tinyurl.com/y7hxg2xl for an example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

reddish-brown stag beetle

reddish-brown stag beetle

6028  Hi,  This is Tiina from Toronto, Ontario. Saw these bugs on the sidewalk in the early evening. They were coming up from the ground in adjacent garden near the base of a tree. They are huge! Shiny, black with menacing looking pincers. What are they?  Tina

This is a stag beetle (Coleoptera: Lucanidae); likely a reddish-brown stag beetle, Lucanus capreolus; see https://tinyurl.com/zny7rzl for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

minute brown scavenger beetle

minute brown scavenger beetle

6027   My name is Trevor. I live in Edmonton Alberta. We started noticing these bugs primarily on the floors of our two second floor bathrooms in our house which are on opposite sides of the second floor. They also frequent window sills in the bathrooms and the bedrooms adjacent to them. We don’t notice them particularly at a specific time of day.  They are all roughly 2-3mm in length. If I do not pick them up well when trying to they will open their wings and I have seen them fly about 2 feet away, I haven’t seen them fly any further than that personally but one of the window sills I have found them on is 4 feet high so I assume they are moderate flyers. These are the best photos I could take and enhance with a macro lens. To my googling they seem like they could be Ahasverus advena, but I am very much an amateur and would like an expert opinion.

This is not Ahasverus advena (foreign grain beetle), it looks more like a minute brown scavenger beetle (Coleoptera: Lathridiidae); see https://tinyurl.com/y7yhjz2v for an example. These are not pests that you need worry about. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

black vine weevil

black vine weevil. another short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil

6026  Hi my name is Kaitlyn and I live in Calgary AB. I’m finding these hard shelled black/grey beetles all over my basement apartment. They aren’t coming from one spot because I’m finding them in every room.

This is another short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae), the black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus (see https://tinyurl.com/pfjs654), is one of the more commonly encountered species indoors. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil

short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil

6025  I have found a few of these inside my home and outside as well. What is it? They have just come out in may. I have a dog so he may be bringing them inside.  Thank you!  Vanessa

This is a short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae), but the image is not clear enough for a more specific identification. The adults basically are nuisance pests that cause no serious harm, but their larvae can be serious pests – see http://tinyurl.com/monvaej for detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

crane fly

crane fly

6024  What is this bug? Found Northern Ontario.  Thank you!  Stephanie

This is a crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae) in the genus Tanyptera (formerly Ctenophora); see https://tinyurl.com/y9npojm5 for an image. Their larvae are found in decaying wood.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

stink bug

stink bug

6023   Hi there, This is my first time to saw such unique insect walking on the corridor outside of a furniture store. Country: Malaysia.  Michelle

This is a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), but I cannot place a specific name on it at present. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

twice-stabbed stink bug

twice-stabbed stink bug

6022    This was found on a compact cranberry bush in Saskatchewan. It is the size of a lady bug.  Friend or foe?

This is a twice-stabbed stink bug, Cosmopepla lintneriana (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae); see https://tinyurl.com/y9ybqct7 for an image and more information. They feed primarily on seeds, and usually are not considered serious pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 

Firefly larva

Firefly larva

6021   Marge from New Brunswick; this was on the step … what is it?

This appears to be a larva of a firefly (Coleoptera: Lampyridae), see https://tinyurl.com/y7rrweg4 for an example. These are general predators on other small arthropods as well as snails, etc. The larvae of some net-winged beetles (Coleoptera: Lycidae) also can be similar in appearance. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

pseudoscorpion

pseudoscorpion

6020   Hi my name is Tammy from Midland Ontario Canada. Just found this in my house…is it a tick? If no what is it? Thank you for your help.

This is not an insect, but is an arachnid called a pseudoscorpion. They are general predators on other small arthropods and completely harmless to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/ox8sx4o for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

click beetle

Click Beetle

6019    In Welland, Ontario Niagara region, found by our cat.‎ In upstairs rug. We were working outside the day before.   Elizabeth

This is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae); a harmless accidental intruder. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

spider beetle

spider beetle

6018   I found this bug between my bed sheets after having moved some sweaters onto my bed that were in the kitchen. I live in Montreal, Quebec. We have spring weather right now. The bug seems to have antennae that it uses to feel its environment and walks almost robotically, so I looked up different beetles online. What do you think?   Jessica.

This is a spider beetle (Coleoptera: Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae) in the genus Mezium – see https://tinyurl.com/ybqkudyq for an example. These can be pests in a variety of dry stored food products; see https://tinyurl.com/mamup5 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

male elm sawfly

male elm sawfly

6017  This insect was found in my yard.  4th June 2017.  It was large, the size of a Canadian loony with wings extended.  Location Saskatoon.  Weather conditions hot and dry.   Can you identify it please.   Thank you.  Bill. 

This looks like a male elm sawfly, Cimbex americana (Hymenoptera Cimbicidae), see https://tinyurl.com/y8tvlk5d for an image. Their larvae look like caterpillars (see https://tinyurl.com/y8r9mckt), and feed on the leaves of elm and willow trees; they are not considered serious pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

bed bug

Bed bugs in bathroom

6016   I live in the north Okanagan in British Columbia and have found several of these in my bathroom (over the past few weeks) where my dog likes to lay on the cool lino floor as it is May/June and quite hot here.  This bug is about ¼ inch long.   I am hoping it is not a tick…   Ruby

 This is a bed bug, a much more difficult pest to eliminate than ticks.   Read more about getting rid of them:  http://pestcontrolcanada.com/how-to-get-rid-of-bed-bugs
You would probably be wise to contact a pest professional in your area to inspect and treat the problem. http://pestcontrolcanada.com/british-columbia/okanagan-Thompson
 

stonefly

stonefly

6015    Hello there! This guy was found today inside an apartment in Fort McMurray, Alberta. It was posted on one of the local Facebook groups and has drawn a lot of attention as to what it is. I was hoping you could help us put the mystery to rest. To me it looks like a stonefly or Mayfly. The picture doesn’t show but it has spotted wings. All of Fort McMurray greatly appreciates your feedback! Thank you for your time.  Christina

This does indeed appear to be a stonefly (order Plecoptera), but because of the angle from which the photo was taken, I cannot tell you much more about its identity. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

rove beetles

rove beetles

6014    These have shown up in a basement laundry room. We’ve put out some sticky traps which is where they are showing up. We seem to rarely see live bugs, the ones we see are already dead.  Can you help us identify this?   Regards,    Derek.  St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada

Like No. 6007, these are rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae); general predators on other small arthropods. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

leaf beetles

leaf beetles

6013    Hi my name is Sydney and we are currently at South Bay, Turtle Lake, Saskatchewan and we have been here for a few days and noticed a lot of reeds washed up on the beach. It’s May long so the beach is always a mess from the melted ice but there are excess reeds. After 3 days of being here we noticed bump like things all over the reeds (tons of them) and after sitting on the beach for a few minute we noticed some of them starting to move and fly around. Within the hour of sitting there they were everywhere. All over our clothes, hair, chairs and everything. They seem harmless but more annoying and creepy crawly. They’ve now somewhat clung to all the windows and outside of the cabin. It was cool and windy all day yesterday but today it’s about 18-19 degrees. And for size they’re about 7-8mm long. Just curious of what they are and if they are harmful in anyway. Thank you.

These are leaf beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae); likely in the subfamily Galerucinae, but I am uncertain as to the exact species. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

ground beetle

ground beetle

6012  Hello there,  Please help me identify the bugs shown on the attached pictures. They are about 5 mm in length.  My name is John and I live in North York (Toronto) in a townhouse complex where there are more than 300 units. To my knowledge only my next door neighbour and I got our homes infested by these bugs, first last year and then this year as well. This year the bugs appeared about 3 weeks ago and most of them concentrated at the window sill and adjacent areas on the floor.  These creatures fly occasionally but mostly crawl and some reach onto other areas of the house. Others are found dead at the end of day. Since they come from the outside, the condominium corporation brought in a pest control company who applied some kind of spray outside of the house but it was not effective since they keep coming into our places.  Please let me know what kind of bugs are these and how we can get rid of them.   Thank you and best regards,  John

This appears to be a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Ones like this are general predators on other small arthropods, mainly other insects, and thus could be considered beneficial. If you don’t want them around, simply vacuum them up. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

reproductive caste termite

reproductive caste termite

6011   Many of these were noticed in the bedroom of a beach house rental today, located in Galveston, Texas. Any ideas of what this could be?  Tommy

This is a reproductive caste termite that has shed its wings. The management of the property should be notified so that they may take appropriate control actions; see https://tinyurl.com/y9xflnfc for a starting point. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

nymph of a cicada

nymph of a cicada

6010   This was found in Armstrong BC Canada. There was another one found that looks like it was shedding it skin.    Shannon

This most likely is a nymph of a cicada (Hemiptera/ Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae); these spend up to 17 years (depending on the species) underground feeding on the sap from tree roots, before emerging and transforming to the adult winged stage. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

bumble bee or a carpenter bee

bumble bee or a carpenter bee

6009  This bug has been flying around outside my bedroom window for three days now. I just want to know if it’s dangerous or not.

This is either a bumble bee or a carpenter bee; as it has been sprayed with some substance, I cannot be certain which it is. Also, I believe that this image has been posted before. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Future queen carpenter ant

Future queen carpenter ant

6008  Hello we live in Shawnigan Lake BC on Vancouver Island and have been seeing these black ants outside and inside our home over the past few days.  How do we get rid of them is it possible to do this on our own? Are these carpenter ants should we be concerned if we leave them alone will they eventually go away?  Thanks,  Vicki

This is a female reproductive carpenter ant, probably Modoc species. The ant has been fertilized and has removed her wings. (See the scars on her thorax)  She will be seeking wet wood to burrow into and start a new nest. She will lay about 70,000 eggs over the next 15 years.   Read more about carpenter ants.

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