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6173

6173  Hello,  I live in Burlington, Ontario and I found a very small worm/caterpillar on the wall. Can you ID it for me? It moved very slowly in a wave-like manner. Pics are attached. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks    RM.

 

6172

6172  Attached is a photo of possible bug eggs that were found beneath a baseboard heater in Ottawa, ON. The bottom of the heater is very dusty but these “eggs” were not which suggests that they are new, although this is unknown. It is currently November and there is snow on the ground. These “eggs” were found indoors. They are about the size and shape of popcorn kernels. It is also unknown what the two larger objects are (the long one on the carpet on the bottom left and the one on the baseboard heater on the top right). Please let me know if any of these look familiar. Thanks. Erin

 

6171

R/sir,
myself:   shriram
crop: cotton
month: November
weather: low temp 20 degree c.

 

Buprestid Beetle

6170  Hello & please help Identify the attached larva;  The hole in the oak floor is where the larva was found. White powder sawdust was removed with an air blast and the larva was coaxed out by injecting wasp foam spray into the bore hole about 3-1/4” long. The home is located between Brantford and Paris Ontario.  Thanks;   Gord

Yellow mealworm beetle pupa

Yellow mealworm beetle pupa

6169   This 6 legged insect may have entered my house on a jacket  that was left outside overnight.  Two days ago it seemed lifeless after my cat discovered it, soft, moist and pale like shrimp but now it’s segments are dry and more solid… then it wiggled when handled for the photo so perhaps I’ll return it to the thickets once this rain lets up.  I hope you might be able to identify it as friendly and native to my area?  Mild in October, near a mix of wooded swamp and wild fields in Trenton, Ontario.

This is a pupa of a beetle; likely that of a yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor; Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae); see https://tinyurl.com/yaa2l9g3 for an image. These beetles are cosmopolitan in distribution, and sometimes can be pests in stored grains, especially those that have been damaged by excess moisture. See https://tinyurl.com/puwfch2 for detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

western conifer seed bug

western conifer seed bug

6168     Found inside and out, mainly spring and fall.  They all look to be of same size and colouring.  Property near tidal water.  Thanks,  Mark.

This is a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). These often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. See https://tinyurl.com/ybmonu3 for detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

ant-like flower beetle

ant-like flower beetle

6167  This specimen was caught in a bug trap (baited with black and varied carpet beetle pheromone and a food pellet), placed in a carpeted lunchroom near a wall and a radiator. We collected this specimen on October 23, 2017 (specimen was likely caught in trap within the last week). Our geographical location is Burlington Ontario.  Thanks,  Corey.  Botany Intern, Royal Botanical Gardens

This looks like an ant-like flower beetle (Coleoptera: Anthicidae); see https://tinyurl.com/yar8cj9z for an example. Some of these will infest stored grains and dried fruit; see https://tinyurl.com/yajgg7t6 for detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

female orb-weaving spider

female orb-weaving spider

6166 Hello I would greatly appreciate it if you could help me identify this spider thank you.  Nicola

This is a very well-fed (and likely gravid) female orb-weaving spider in the genus Araneus, likely A. diadematus, a very common and widespread species in the northern hemisphere. In North America, it usually is called a cross spider whereas in Europe, it usually is called the European garden spider. See https://tinyurl.com/mfwo8t2 for more detailed information  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

saw-toothed grain beetles

saw-toothed grain beetles

6165  Can you please identify the insects in these photos. They have infested my kitchen and I would like to know how to be rid of them. Thanks.

These appear to be saw-toothed grain beetles, Oryzaephilus surinamensis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae). These beetles and their close cousins merchant grain beetles (O. mercator) are cosmopolitan pests of dry stored food products. See https://tinyurl.com/lodnxbs for more detailed information including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

click beetle

click beetle

6164   Found this live bug this morning (5:30am) on my bathroom mat, I am location in Brampton, Ontario, Canada.  Legs would tuck in when prodded, then after few seconds get up and move.  Moves pretty quickly.  Size is approx 4mm from tip of head (not antennae) to backend.  The weather is just starting to here to single digits (celcius) in the morning.  I have seen this bug dead before (about 5 of them) in the bedroom near the mattress, and once on the mattress when I was changing the sheets, they were all dead.  Would like to know what this bug is and if I need to take action.  With kind regards,   Amy

This is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae), it appears to be in the genus Aeolus – see https://tinyurl.com/y8lo5jr7 for an example. These simply are accidental intruders that will do no harm.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

red-cross shield bug

red-cross shield bug

6163    This was on the roof inside our holiday trailer on August 28, 2017.  It was about 5/8” in length and 3/8” wide.  When my husband picked it off the ceiling he said it wouldn’t “squish” in between his fingers because the body was hard.  We were camping at Tunnel Mountain Campground, in Banff, Alberta.  Neither of us have seen a bug like this before, so thank you for identifying it for us.   Mary and Garry

This appears to be a red-cross shield bug, Elasmostethus cruciatus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Acanthosomatidae); see https://tinyurl.com/ybfqbwfy for an image. They appear to feed primarily on alder trees. These are very close relatives to true stink bugs in the family Pentatomidae, and sometimes may be mistaken for one of those.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

oil beetle, a type of blister beetle

oil beetle, a type of blister beetle

6162   Hi.  This beetle was found in field behind my house on a sunny day during mid-October.  I live in Port Elgin, Ontario.  I don’t remember ever seeing this beetle before and didn’t see it on your website.  The beetle is fairly large at around 3.5 cm long.   My son has suggested that it may be an Oil beetle. Please confirm.  Andy.  Port Elgin, ON

This is indeed an oil beetle, a type of blister beetle (Coleoptera: Meloidae) in the genus Meloe. They are called oil beetles because of their habit of exuding an oily fluid (their equivalent of blood) from between their joints when handled roughly. This fluid contains a chemical (cantharidin) that can cause blisters on tender skin. See https://tinyurl.com/y7jhuhrq for more information.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

brown prionid

brown prionid

6161   Please help with ID of this guy. My son found him already dead. It looks like a borer of some kind but I cannot find it online anywhere.  We live on the edge of a wooded area, and just received a load of wood from a local source in the last 2 weeks.  Thanks, Jennifer.   Just outside of Greater Kingston Area, Ontario, Canada.

This appears to be a brown prionid, Orthosoma brunneum (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), see https://tinyurl.com/y7tpzvhg for an image. Their larvae bore in damp/rotting wood, usually that in contact with soil; they are not destructive. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

house centipede

house centipede

6160   Location: Valleyfield, Quebec, Canada.  Place fund: book store, build on a concrete slab.  We had the insects showed in post 5612.  But they evolve into this and they still move really fast.   They now measure about 5cm long and when they flee they’re about 2cm tall.   We would like to know what are those bugs and can they bite or damage any goods in the store ?   There is no food, it’s a book store.  Thank you.  Rachel O.

This is a house centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata (Chilopoda: Scutigeromorpha), a peridomestic species having a very wide distribution. They cause no damage, but feed on other arthropods that they happen across. Although the house centipede is capTable of biting a human, this seldom occurs, and the effect of a bite reportedly is no worse than a minor bee sting. See https://tinyurl.com/mn7mzf for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

robber flies

robber flies

6159     What is this??   mating strange pair!  Holly

These are robber flies (Diptera: Asilidae); likely in the genus Promachus – see https://tinyurl.com/yddn9x4h for an example. Robber flies are ambush predators that simply wait until a potential meal flies/wanders into striking distance. They then fly out, nab their victim, and bring it back to their perch for a leisurely meal.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

German cockroach

German cockroach

6158  This has been found in a townhouse unit multiple have been present they have antennas and are a winged species but not recognized to fly, medium brown in color resemble a grasshopper in the legs, it has travelled through ventilation to other units as well, any suggestive information to identify would be greatly appreciated. 

This is a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), a peridomestic species that is notoriously difficult to control in multiple-unit dwellings. See https://tinyurl.com/h3nd9z8 elsewhere on this site for some cockroach control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

eye-spotted lady beetle

eye-spotted lady beetle

6157   Hi. I am in Paradise, NL. I found this crawling  on my siding. Way bigger than a ladybug.

This is an eye-spotted lady beetle, Anatis mali (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae); see https://tinyurl.com/y8mfo6r9 for an image. Lady beetles in the genus Anatis are among the largest found in North America; I recall being very impressed by the ones I found on our North Dakota farm some 60 years ago.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Assassin bug nymph

Assassin bug nymph

6156  Hello I just killed this bug in our child’s room in Toronto, Please note the little spots on the back. Please help! Richard 

This is a nymph of Reduvius personatus, an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as a masked hunter. This is an introduced species likely of European origin that is frequently found indoors where it feeds on the insects and other arthropods it finds there. It is reported to have a very painful (but not dangerous) bite; see https://tinyurl.com/23g4bdy for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Australian cockroach nymph

Australian cockroach nymph

6155 I found this in a drawer in our house in Halifax Nova Scotia. Can you please identify and tell me if I need to be concerned. Thanks.  Ray

This appears to be a nymph of an Australian cockroach, Periplaneta australasiae (Blattodea: Blattidae), a peridomestic species found in many areas of eastern North America. See https://tinyurl.com/h3nd9z8 elsewhere on this site for some cockroach control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

click beetle

click beetle

6154  Hello,  Found this 5mm long insect (photos attached) indoors in Southern Ontario this month (Oct)   Any idea what it is?  Adam

This is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae), possibly in the genus Aeolus – see https://tinyurl.com/y8lo5jr7 for an example. Just an accidental intruder, it will do no harm.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Boxelder bug

Boxelder bugs

Hello, Could you tell me what these are and if they are something I need to be worried about. Sam

6153  These are boxelder bugs. In the fall they may crawl into cracks and cavities around a home seeking shelter from winter. They are a nuisance but not harmful. For more information see: http://pestcontrolcanada.com/box-elder-bugs

 

male drumming katydid

male drumming katydid

6152    Hi,   I’m curious if you might be able to identify this insect. The picture was taken late August 2017 in the Vancouver, BC Canada area. The insect seemed to have sticky pads of some type on it’s “feet”, as it wouldn’t easily come loose when the cup was repeatedly shaken/banged outside, until it flung (didn’t fly) and stuck/grasped against the side of the nearby house about 4’ away.    Any help would be appreciated.   Thanks,  Jason

This appears to be a male drumming katydid,  Meconema thalassinum (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae); see https://tinyurl.com/yd9ylbvp for an image. This is a European species that has been introduced into North America; in Europe, it is known as the oak bush-cricket.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

eastern giant crane fly

eastern giant crane fly

6151   Cindy from Val Caron, Ontario, Canada.  Photo taken October 7th 2017.

This is an eastern giant crane fly, Pedicia albivitta (Diptera: Tipulidae), see https://tinyurl.com/yaap923k for an image. They are completely harmless.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

banded tussock moth caterpillar

banded tussock moth caterpillar

6150   I found this caterpillar in Weldon Park in London, Ontario a week ago (late September). Is it a banded tussock? I’m curious to know what the white things are on it’s back.  Kelly

This does appear to be a banded tussock moth caterpillar (Halysidota tessellaris; Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae). The white objects are the cocoons spun by larvae of a parasitic wasp (likely a braconid in the subfamily Microgastrinae) that developed within the body of the caterpillar. When the larvae are fully grown, they chew through the cuticle of the caterpillar and then spin a cocoon that protects them during their pupal stage. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Black vine weevil

Black vine weevil

I am from Toronto, I found this thing walking around my bedroom. It is about one cm. 

6149  This is a short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae), likely a black vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus).  Adults will occasionally invade homes but they cause no harm there. See http://tinyurl.com/monvaej for detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

caterpillar of a swallowtail butterfly

caterpillar of a swallowtail butterfly

I came home from work today to find this little guy crawling on the side of our house! Any idea what it is?  Thanks Dave

This is a caterpillar of a swallowtail butterfly (Lepidoptera: Paplionidae) in the genus Papilio; see https://tinyurl.com/y7c8pns8 for an example. These caterpillars often change from green to brown as they get ready to pupate.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

rodent bot fly

rodent bot fly

6148    Found in interior BC near Nelson in August.  Approximately 1.25 inches long (large).  Unable to identify.  Lauren 

This is a rodent bot fly (Diptera: Oestridae; Cuterebra sp.). Their larvae develop under the skin of several species of rodents; the adult flies lack functional mouthparts and are harmless. See https://tinyurl.com/ybftn3ff for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

golden buprestid beetle

golden buprestid beetle

6147   I’m from Parksville, B.C. I found this dead bug burrowed in my carport wood beam also when removing a rotted piece from a beam I found a larvae. Here I thought termites were my biggest problem. I had already squirted some termidor poison in all the visible holes, I also removed a sunflower seed they must have used as a plug. What are my options?

This is Buprestis aurulenta, a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) sometimes called the golden buprestid or jewel beetle. This species can spend a remarkably long time in its larval stages; see https://tinyurl.com/ycs5h2sj for detailed information. At this point, there is no useful control option; see https://tinyurl.com/yakc6r4x for details.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius

larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius

6146   This is some kind of beetle, but I’ve never seen it before. Found indoors in Saskatchewan today (Oct. 3). The photo is taken on the dining table, so please excuse the grainy background.  Lisa 

This is a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), a cosmopolitan pantry pest. See https://tinyurl.com/nw92wz  for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

brown marmorated stink bug

6145  We are finding the bug on our window. I have pleaded blinds in the front window and they are crawling I’m the pleats. They are half a inch or three quarters of a inch they have wings and are brown with a light stomach. 

This is a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), an introduced species that has become a pest in much of North America. See https://tinyurl.com/nkexo3 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

long-horned wood-boring beetle

long-horned wood-boring beetle

6143  What is it, I found it hiding on my porch.

This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae, it looks like Tragosoma depsarium; see http://tinyurl.com/y7g53rba for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Slug, snail, chrysalis?

6142   I didn’t see anything else like this odd little thing on your site. It was found at Victoria Beach, Manitoba, in August (summer), outdoors on a nice day – 25-ish degrees Celsius. Thanks for looking at it – your site is great.  Ida

I cannot tell for certain what this is – if it was moving and very soft in texture, it would be a slug, a shelless mollusk related to snails. If it was hard to the touch and immobile, it might be a chrysalis of a small butterfly. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

metallic wood-boring beetle

metallic wood-boring beetle

6141  My name is Diane. I am 10 years old.
I found this insect: 
Outside,  Sunny day,  July 21, 2017 (summer)
Geography (Orleans / Ottawa area) very near the Ottawa river
The insect looks a bit like bark off of a tree. Grey in colour.
The insect from tail to head (not including the antennae) is 3.4 cms long.
He seemed like a pretty friendly little critter 😊
Diane

This is a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae); it looks like a member of the genus Chalcophora – see http://tinyurl.com/yawxrvbw for an example and additional information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

dog-day cicada

dog-day cicada

6140  Hello I’m hoping to identify this insect that was on our dock by the lake in Renfrew, ON. Taken late August. It was as large as the top of my thumb.

This is a cicada, specifically one of the so-called dog-day cicadas in the genus Neotibicen – see http://tinyurl.com/y8ngs5m9 for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Japanese beetle

Japanese beetle

6139   We have found two of these bugs on our deck this summer. We live 60 miles west of Toronto.  I do a lot of gardening and suspect they like it.  The white spots along he lower body were interesting enough for me to ask what bug is this.  Thank you,  Alex

This is a Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), an introduced species that has become a serious pest in much of North America. See http://tinyurl.com/hzjj3my for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

dog mite

Dog mite

6138  Hi! I’m hoping someone can help me identify this bug. I found a few on my bedding today, my dogs also sleep on the bed. They were tiny… not even a millimetre, the few I saw were reddish brown in colour. The attached is under 4x magnification.  thank you,  Juliana.

Your photo is a bit dark for identification but is does look like a mite. Definitely not a bed bug.

bed bug

Bed bug

6137  This was found on my daughter’s bed. No others have been found. She lives in Ottawa. The photo was taken on Sept 18, 2017.

This is a bed bug.  Your daughter should  call a professional or contact the landlord if she is renting.
http://pestcontrolcanada.com/bed-bugs

metallic wood-boring beetle

metallic wood-boring beetle

6136   Hi   I found this shiny brown bug inside, on the cold tile floor. The location is lakeside, at Seeleys Bay, about 30 minutes north of Kingston, Ontario.  The bug is about 1cm in length (about the size of a dime).  I looked through beetle (and cockroach) references on- line but didn’t see any creatures with this kind of hind end. Would be so pleased to learn what it is.   Thank-you, Jennifer. 

This is a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae); it looks like a member of the genus Dicera – see http://tinyurl.com/yck2f6ox for an example and http://tinyurl.com/yb2k33qe for additional information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

two-spotted tree cricket

two-spotted tree cricket

6135  Hi there,  Curious to know what kind of bug this is? It’s currently hanging onto the screen door off of our dining room. We’re located in Burlington, Ontario, Canada. It’s a fairly cool evening here, about 15C (59F).  Ian 

This is a two-spotted tree cricket. Neoxabea bipunctata (Orthoptera: Gryllidae); see http://tinyurl.com/ya9war7g for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Masked Hunter

6134   Hi.  This bug was just inside my house in Nova Scotia. Is this a form of tick?

This is a masked Hunter. Both adults and nymphs are predators that feed on other insects including flies, carpet beetles, mealworms and bed bugs. The adult bug is dark brown or black and about 3/4 of inch long. The nymphs or immatures are covered with microscopic hairs which catch and hold dust, lint, and other small particles of debris.
See https://pestid.msu.edu/insects-and-arthropods/masked-red-hunter for more information.

Carpenter ant nest damage

6133   Hi, there,  I saw this under my deck. Did not see the ant, but I am wondering if it sign of white ant?  Thanks a lot. I live in Burnaby, B.C.  Jerry

The holes and course wood fibre (frass) indicate typical damage caused by carpenter ants. See this web page for more information: http://pestcontrolcanada.com/ants/carpenter-ants

long-horned wood-boring beetle

long-horned wood-boring beetle

6132 Hi.  We found this beetle by the garage in July in Grand Forks BC. I couldn’t find any photos to match on the website.  Can you identify it?  Thanks,  Lennette. 

This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); it looks like Prionus californicus – see https://tinyurl.com/2ue3qel for an image and detailed information on its life history.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

flat-backed millipede

flat-backed millipede

6131  Hello! My name is Nikki.  I found this guy at work in the gorge today, at the base of the Niagara Falls. Ontario, Canada

This is a flat-backed millipede (family Polydesmida) in the family Xystodesmidae; it looks like Sigmoria trimaculata – see https://tinyurl.com/yct6dqg9 for an image. These are harmless detrivores, but have an interesting defensive mechanism. When disturbed (as in being handled roughly) some species give off a chemical compound that includes cyanide (not enough to be harmful to a human. If you sniff one carefully, you might detect a faint odor of almonds. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 

reproductive termite

reproductive termite

6130    On September 8, 2017 we found aprox. 50 bugs in our home. We have never had a bug problem in the past. We spent the night vacuuming and were hoping that they were gone, unfortunately two days later they are back.   Size :  aprox 2 mm,  month: September,  after a hot dry summer, we first found them after the first rain fall.  These photos were taken on Sept 10 after another short rain fall. We are a one story home with a cement/ dirt crawl space. They are in all of our rooms. We are hoping to find out whether this needs to be taken care professionally and what they are. We are in the regional district of Nanaimo BC, in the village of Cedar. Thank you.  Laura and Gordon

This is a reproductive termite that has shed its wings; it appears to be a Reticulitermes sp. As termites in this genus can be quite destructive, you should consider contacting a reputable termite management company for a thorough inspection of your premises. See https://tinyurl.com/yblhwske elsewhere on this site for listings. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

reproductive termite

reproductive termite

6129  What is this?  Found him crawling on the kitchen floor and it’s about 1.5cm long and is a reddish brown colour. We are in the Fraser Valley and it’s early September. Thanks Andy.

This is a reproductive termite that has shed its wings; it looks like a Pacific dampwood termite, Zootermopsis angusticollis (Blattodea: Archotermopsidae).  Unlike subterranean termites, these seldom cause any damage to structures. See https://tinyurl.com/y9kdsoe3 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

flea beetles

flea beetles

6128  Hi there.  Would you mind please helping me identify this beetle. Found on a grapevine in Southern Okanagan,  Duncan

These appear to be flea beetles, possibly grape flea beetles, Altica chalybea (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae); see https://tinyurl.com/y9sfpcuo for an image. Foliage feeding such as shown in your image seldom causes any serious harm to the plants, but overwintering adults feeding on developing buds in the spring can have an impact. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

black burying beetle

black burying beetle

6127  Dear Sir/ Madam, Kindly help me identify these insects. Photo was taken in Mission, British Columbia, Canada on the last week of August, 2017.  I am not sure if those insects at the back of the beetle are its babies or some kind of “Tick’? Thanks very much in advance! Martin

This appears to be a black burying beetle, Nicrophorus nigrita (Coleoptera: Silphidae); see https://tinyurl.com/y8r24ma6 for an image. The smaller critters on its back are mites, likely Poecilochirus necrophori. These mites are getting a free ride (phoresy) to their next meal (they appear to feed both on carrion and on the eggs/small maggots of carrion-feeding flies). See https://tinyurl.com/y7tjr32o for details on the beetle-mite relationship. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

carpet beetles

carpet beetles

6126  My name is Amanda. I am located in downtown Toronto & I have just found an accumulation of these dead bugs in my window sill. They are approx. 2mm in length. There appears to be 2 different kinds – one with a bronze coloured body, the other with a speckled grey body. They appear to have wings.The apartment has been closed up while we were away on summer vacation and these were located between the blind and the window.

These are carpet beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae); the brownish elongate ones appear to be in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetles and allies) and the round gray one appears to be in the genus Anthrenus (varied carpet beetle and allies). See https://tinyurl.com/zl9w25c elsewhere on this site for more information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

 

sphinx moth caterpillar

sphinx moth caterpillar

6125   Hello, I don’t think I saw this one on any of the pages. It was found just outside of Port Elgin Ontario. I would say it was maybe 2 inches long and crawling pretty quickly.  Thanks!  Russ

This is a caterpillar of a sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae); possibly Ceratomia undulosa (the waved sphinx) – see https://tinyurl.com/yd9a2d6q for an image. These caterpillars often change colour from greenish to pinkish/reddish just before undergoing pupation.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

larva of a lady beetle

larva of a lady beetle

6124   Hadashville , Manitoba , destroying my bean crops ,especially the fava beans worst ,thank you …..Sam 

This is the larva of a lady beetle (Coleoptera:, Coccinellidae); specifically, it is an Asian multi-coloured lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis). These are not damaging your plants, but feed on aphids and other small, soft-bodied insects – see https://tinyurl.com/3cc75vc for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

 

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