Thousands of pest photos submitted for identification.

True fruit flies

True fruit flies

5828  I found this in Hamilton Ontario on my front porch. I wouldn’t have looked twice at it, but from a distance it looked like a small scorpion. Upon closer inspection, it was a flying insect camouflaged like a scorpion, which I find strange, since there are no native scorpion species in this area. –Dan

Flies with this type of wing pattern usually belong to the family Tephritidae (true fruit flies); see http://tinyurl.com/j89kmhs for an example. I have seen it posited that this wing pattern may serve to mimic jumping spiders, common predators on these flies. Some species can be very serious orchard pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

ambush bugs

ambush bugs

5827  Found these two in my yard in Brantford Ontario this past summer. Wondering what they are.  Scott.

These are ambush bugs (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae; subfamily Phymatinae). They lay in wait on vegetation, especially flowers, for potential meals to come close enough to grab. They are capable of overpowering prey items much larger than themselves. See http://tinyurl.com/ngzv3nn for more detailed information,  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

 5826  The photo was taken in Mississauga, Ont. on Oct.11/16. The bug is dead, my husband found it crawling on the wall upstairs in our house and squished it, so a leg or two might not be showing up but I think the photos are fairly clear. I hope you can identify it and let me know what it is and if I need to do anything to eliminate any future visits by its friends.  Thanks so much.  June

This is a broad-nose/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. See nos. 5781, 5779, and 5774 for other examples. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

5825   Hi there – some relatives are currently in Lourmarin in the South of France and the came across this little creature.   Just wondering if you might know what it is – or how I might find out. Thanks so much, Kathy

This is a mature caterpillar of an oleander hawkmoth, Daphnis nerii (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae); see Daphnis nerii – Wikipedia
Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Winged ant

Winged ant

5824   What is this? Darrin

This appears to be a winged ant of some sort, but this image is not clear enough to say much more. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Cockroach nymph

Cockroach nymph

5823   I live in Montreal, Quebec, in a basement apartment. It was raining when this thing appeared in my living room. It’s about the size of my fingernail (about 1-2 cm) I trapped it in a small mason jar until I could identify it. I really hope it’s not a cockroach because my place is meticulously clean and I’ve never had to deal with that before. Thanks,  Jennifer

This is indeed a nymph of a cockroach, but I cannot say exactly which species. At least it is not a German cockroach, which is both a very common and somewhat difficult to control species. Cockroaches are very adaptable creatures, and their presence is no indicator of any lack of cleanliness. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

scarlet malachite beetle larva

scarlet malachite beetle larva

5822  Hi there,  I’m Greg and live in Edmonton. A week ago moved in to the new duplex. I realized that every day was finding an insect at home in different locations like a bathroom, walk in closet, kitchen and this morning even in my daughter bed. I didn’t met this gays before so have no idea what to do. It has around 10 – 15mm long. I’m sending you 2 pictures with it. Thx for any advice, Greg.

This is a larva of a scarlet malachite beetle, Malachius aeneus (Coleoptera: Melyridae) – see http://tinyurl.com/khegf6s for detailed information. This is not a pest, but simply an accidental intruder. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

burying/sexton beetle

burying/sexton beetle

5821  Found this trying to fly on a warm sunny day on Quadra Island BC. I can’t identify the large insect but assume mites are on his/her back.  The mites if that’s what they are eventually killed the larger insect after an hour or so of serious torment.

This is a burying/sexton beetle (Coleoptera: Silphidae) in the genus Nicrophorus. The little red critters are mites that are using the beetle as transportation (a phenomenon known as phoresy) to get to their next meal source – see http://tinyurl.com/gumcmra for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

western conifer seed bug

Harmless western conifer seed bug

5820   My name is Erin. I found this bug in my apartment in Nova Scotia, Canada. I have been waking up with bug bites the last few weeks (September). On Thursday October 6 I woke up with a bite on my hand and one on my pinky, hand was swollen and red and bite was extremely itchy. My boyfriend found the first bug dead under his pillow. I then found another one dead underneath our dresser. From my research it looks like kissing bug or assassin bug. I’m scared that I may have contracted Chagas’ disease.  Emerg doctors wouldn’t do anything/test my blood. September was really warm and our building in general is quite warm/humid.  

This would not cause any bites, it’s a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, a harmless nuisance pest in the family Coreidae. These commonly enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there; see http://tinyurl.com/ybmonu3 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

moth in the family Alucitidae

moth in the family Alucitidae

5819   This moth is about 1 cm wide. They are new to our farmhouse and are small enough to wiggle into the house past the edges of the screens on the windows.  They are attracted to the nightlight so I have counted 10 in our bathroom in the morning.  When I kill them they are fragile and leave a dust smear on the wall.  They are quite lively if you don’t grab them quickly and they will fly away.  I live in northeastern Alberta Canada.  As I mentioned, I have never seen these before this summer and I have been unable to identify them on any website.  Can you tell me what they are and what their source might be so I can deal with them?   Catherine

This is a moth in the family Alucitidae (many-plumed moths); likely Alucita montana – see http://tinyurl.com/h8fz34q for more detailed information. These are not pests, their larvae likely are leaf and flower miners of snowberry (Symphoricarpos spp.). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

wingless parasitic wasp

wingless parasitic wasp

5818   Hi. I found this ant running around the edge of my cat’s water bowl. It is red with a black head and long pointy thing on the butt end. Can you tell me about it? It was in Gibsons, BC. Thanks!  Tracy

This is not an ant, but a small wingless parasitic wasp of some kind. See http://tinyurl.com/gmt2x2k for another example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Phorid flies pupae

Phorid flies pupae

5817   My name is Ellie…  These photos were taken in Columbus, Ohio.  In October, these bugs were found under the cat’s water bowl on an ident on the underside of the bowl. The area around where they were found was wet and bowl had not been moved for a bit. (The apartment has AC and cat is only an indoor cat.) They all measure about a quarter of a centimeter. They are a light brown/ tan color with very small reddish-brown coloring on “face” and tail end. It appears that they have antenna. They look like very small grains of rice- or like a oval pill shape.  Thank you!

These are the pupae of flies in the family Phoridae (scuttle/hump-backed flies). These are very common nuisance pests whose larvae develop quickly in bits of decomposing organic matter. They are frequent ‘guests’ in our kitchen where we have a small composting bin. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

male orb weaving spider

Male orb weaving spider

5816  Seen crawling up the wall at my school! Please let me know if we should be cautious! please help, I’ve been scouring the Internet for hours and can’t seem to find anything that resembles this.

This is a male orb weaving spider, likely in the genus Araneus. Unlike the females, males often are found wandering about off their web. They are completely harmless. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Tenebrionidae larvae of a beetle

larvae of a beetle in the family Tenebrionidae

5815   I found these in a light hanging from the roof. How would they get there? Is this something I should be worried about? And please tell me what they are.

These appear to be the larvae of a beetle in the family Tenebrionidae, which includes nuisance pests such as the yellow mealworm. They are unlikely to cause any harm in their current location, but you might want to periodically check any areas where you store grains, seeds, etc. for any signs of infestation. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Stink bug

Stink Bug

5814  Can  you please help me identify this bug.    It appears to have 2 legs on each side and antennae on its head.  I live in Windsor Ontario. Sherri

This looks like a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), an invasive species that has become widely established in North America. See http://tinyurl.com/nkexo3 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

MILKWEED BUG

Milkweed bug

Hello there I have lived in Bowmanville Ontario for about 15 years now and I have never seen this bug, until 3 days ago I saw one and thought nothing of it. Then I saw a post on Facebook warning if you see this bug in your house then go to a disease heath center immediately. Now today being Thursday October 6th 2016 I have approx. 30 to 50 gathering/flying around the front, sides, windows of my house as well as the Garage door. They seem to love window screens and anywhere there is a lot of hot sun. My research has show me they are native far southern than me but I’m wondering since we have had such a hot summer if it is possible the migrated north and cause a potential issue. Please take a look at the attached photo and let me know. Thank you, Greg

This a Milkweed bug that looks remarkably like boxelder bugs until you compare the two together.  The differences are then quite obvious.  For milkweed bug information visit the Nature Trust of British Columbia web site. http://www.naturetrust.bc.ca/blog/?m=201104

moth in the family Geometridae

moth in the family Geometridae

5812 Good day.  I found this moth clinging to my backdoor and have no idea what kind of moth it is.  I live in Calgary Alberta.  Can you help?

This is a moth in the family Geometridae. Their larvae often are called inchworms, measuring worms, loopers, etc. because of their peculiar method of locomotion see http://preview.tinyurl.com/jukyqtu for a video clip.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

click beetle

click beetle

5811  Can you please help In identifying this bug found in my house, London Ontario. Thank  you.  Mark

This is a small click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae); these are accidental intruders that will do no damage indoors. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Powder post beetle damage

Powder post beetles

5810  Hi could you identify what insect makes these holes? I believe it may be a beetle of some kind. Brad.  Walkerton Ontario.

The size of the holes and the very fine sawdust would indicate powder post beetles are doing the damage.
See http://tinyurl.com/gqgf7gr for tips on distinguishing the types of wood-boring beetles based on their frass characteristics. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

mygalomorph spider

mygalomorph spider

5809   Hi,   I live in Kelowna BC  This beauty was found in my garage in November 2015.  I recently (couple of weeks ago – August 2016)  found another while walking down the road not far from my house.  I am curious as to what it is.  They are approximately the size of a loonie.  Thank you Corinne 

This is a mygalomorph spider (the group to which tarantulas, etc. belong), possibly a male in the genus Antrodiaetus, see http://tinyurl.com/j3oluh9 for an example. Males of these spiders often are found wandering about, apparently in search of a mate, while the females usually are found in their burrows. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

nymph or exoskeleton of a nymph of a cicada

nymph or exoskeleton of a nymph of a cicada

5808   What kind of bug is this please?   This was taken in Toronto this morning. (Sept. 29) Roland.

This is either a nymph or exoskeleton of a nymph of a cicada (Hemiptera/ Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae), likely that of one of the so-called ‘dog-day’ cicadas in the genus Neotibicen. The nymphs of these insects spend one to several years underground, feeding on the sap from tree roots. When they complete their nymphal development, they tunnel to the surface where they climb some handy nearby object, rest a bit, and then the exoskeleton splits, and the adult cicada emerges – see http://tinyurl.com/gvjaw87 for a short video clip. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

redlined carrion beetle

carrion/burying beetle

5807  HI my name is Kevin. I’m from Sundre, Alberta, Canada. It’s the beginning of fall.  I have found these beetles in my house before and upon hours of looking online I can’t seem to find a match for them. Ive found some close but not the same. This one is approximately 2-2.5cm long. And they smell absolutely vile when you kill them.

This is Necrodes surinamensis, a carrion/burying beetle (Coleoptera/Silphidae) known as the redlined carrion beetle. Beetles in this family are nature’s recyclers, disposing of the carcasses of small birds and mammals as they feed their young; see http://tinyurl.com/hc2ns72 for more details. In the future, please release outdoors any of these that should find their way inside, so that they may carry out their duties.
Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

western conifer seed bug

western conifer seed bug

5806    Can you please let me know what kind of bugs these are? My husband mentioned how they looked like Chagas (the kissing bugs) and I’ve been worried ever since. We live in Bc Canada and they have been all over our house for the past month. Thanks

This is a harmless nuisance pest; it’s a leaf-footed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae); likely a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis. These commonly enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there; see http://tinyurl.com/ybmonu3 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

predaceous diving beetle

predaceous diving beetle

5805   Hi. My name is Tim, and I am located in Hanwell, New Brunswick. I found this dried out husk in my patio door track. I believe it may be a dried out, deflated June Bug, but I wanted to make sure it wasn’t something nasty that got into my house. It appears to be a very dark green with a split down it’s back. It is a large specimen.  This is a very useful site. I have identified many strange looking bugs here. A great resource to have.  – Tim –

This is a predaceous diving beetle (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), likely either Cybister fimbriolatus or Dytiscus verticalis (the distinguishing characters cannot be seen in this image. These beetles and their larvae (water tigers) are general predator on other small aquatic life forms, usually other insects, but occasionally small minnows and tadpoles. The adult beetles are strong fliers, and often can be found quite some distance from the nearest water. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

fungus feeder or scavenger

fungus feeder or scavenger

5804    I live in Minnesota and have never seen this tiny super bright red beetle type bug that borrows little holes all over the place. I pulled this long out of my old 1800’s Catholic Church that rest on my farm. Weather right now is 75 and hardly any humidity. It Sept.19th 2016. And I wouldn’t have ever seen them but I wash old logs and restore them into useful objects. And while soaking log to the point of satcheration it forced them up out of the holes. Please tell me what they are and how to get rid of these before I lose a very old sacred place. My great great great great grandfather built. Now converted into log storage. Thank you!

This does not resemble any of the wood-boring/damaging beetles that I am familiar with; I rather suspect that it might be either a fungus feeder or scavenger. Just because an insect is found in a hole does not mean that it made it. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Mite

Mite

5803   Hi there, I found this very tiny insect in my bathroom. It has an oval shape and yellow color, 6 legs and 2 antennas. The macro zoom is 19x. Could I please know the name of this insect?   Thank you in advance,   – Gregory

This is not an insect, but a mite. What appear to be antennae actually are its first pair of legs. There are several other arthropods lacking antennae that use one pair of their legs (usually the first pair) as if they were antennae. I cannot tell exactly what kind of mite this is, but it does not appear to be a biting kind like bird or rodent mites. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Cave orb weaver spider

Cave orb weaver spider

5802  This is a spider that had MANY buddies, they were in the crawlspace under a house our employees were working in Muskoka Lakes, Ontario.  Him and his friends scared the guys, they are convinced he is toxic, I believe he is not.  Would you like to settle our argument. Jennifer. 

This spider, Meta ovalis, is harmless to humans; it is in the family Tetragnathidae (long-jawed orb weavers) and is commonly known as the cave orb weaver, as it often is found in dark, undisturbed places like caves (and crawl spaces); see http://tinyurl.com/z4h2dwl for details. I have seen quite a few of these in West Virginia caves. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Box Elder Bugs

Box Elder bug swarm

5801  My name is Cynthia Reason and I’m a reporter with Metroland Media Toronto.  I was wondering if you can tell me if the insects in the attached photo are Box Elders Bugs or not?  We’ve had a couple of concerned residents contact us about a fairly large swarm of them in York, and we were hoping to shed some light.  Also, would you be willing to comment for the story, addressing the fact that they are merely a nuisance pest, but not necessarily harmful? Thanks for your time! Cynthia. 

Yes the photo you sent is a typical swarm of box elder bugs.  Apparently this is common in Ontario at this time of year.  They are seldom seen in B.C. so I personally never had to deal with them when I was in the pest control business for 20+ years.   They are harmless to humans and any damage to vegetation is minimal.  If they die in wall cavities of a home, the carcasses can be a food source that will attract other pests such as carpet beetles.  Please see  http://pestcontrolcanada.com/box-elder-bugs  for more information.  If they become too much of a nuisance, a simple, inexpensive and safe control solution is to spray the clusters with soapy water.  (Safer Soap is available at most garden shops)  There are more suggestions on the web page.
Larry Cross,   Webmanager.

Dermestid Beetle

Dermestid Beetle

5800  Hello, found this little guy on my pillow this morning in my apartment. About 4mm long. I believe he has wings but has not flown. I don’t have any bites on me (I’ve had bedbug bites in the past while travelling). No other signs of bugs or feces. Please keep me know what you think.  Thanks, Jill

This is a beetle in the family Dermestidae (hide/skin/carpet/larder beetles, etc.); it looks like an Attagenus sp. (black carpet beetles and allies). See http://tinyurl.com/zl9w25c elsewhere on this site for control/management suggestions.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Foreign grain beetle

Foreign grain beetle

5799  Hi, I’m from waterloo Ontario. I am finding these tiny beetle bugs constantly in my home. I have no idea what they are or if it’s a real issue. I’ve attached a few pictures. Thank you Samantha

This appears to be Ahasverus advena (Coleoptera: Silvanidae), a nuisance pest known as the foreign grain beetle or new house beetle – see http://tinyurl.com/hf8k843 for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Firefly

5798  Hello I am from winnipeg Manitoba, it is September 15th and in the 20s for out door temperature. I found this bug climbing down my wall in my house, I am going through bed bug treatments and was last sprayed September 13th. I am hoping that what ever this bug is, that it is the only one in my unit. I have attached a photo of his back and underside, please help me identify this gross bug.   When it is on its back it flips it’s self over using its butt, a cone shipped thing that comes out from its underwhelming then retracts back when it is on its feet. Eww

This is a firefly (Coleoptera: Lampyridae); likely in the genus Ellychnia, see http://tinyurl.com/hytxztd for an example. Unlike most other fireflies, ones in this genus tend to be active during the daytime rather than in the evening. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Boxelder bugs

Boxelder bugs

5797    Hello.   I am in Kingston, ON and curious to know what this specimen might be.  I found many of them sunning themselves on the stucco of a foundation.   Thank you for this service,   Matthew.

These are boxelder bugs (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Rhopalidae; Boisea sp.); likely the eastern boxelder bug, B. trivittata. These basically are nuisance pests that do little if any real harm – see http://tinyurl.com/pr9y98a for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

female orb weaving spider

female orb weaving spider

5796  Can you please tell me what kind of spider this is. Found on a cement pad in Thunder Bay, Sept 13/2016 Sunny weather, Helen

This is a female orb weaving spider in the genus Araneus that has deposited her eggs and is approaching the end of her natural life. Both A. marmoreus and A. trifolium can have a similar appearance under this condition; I am inclined to believe that this more likely is A. trifolium. See http://tinyurl.com/z49a7bg for another example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.