Thousands of pest photos submitted for identification.

nymph of a cockroach

nymph of a cockroach

5851   I discovered these bugs on a shelf in my cupboard . It happened at the beginning of September when I found cockroaches and started cleaning my food cupboards out. I had inadvertently left banana skins In a plastic bag and they somehow got pushed into a cupboard. There were these beetles quite different from the cockroaches. After I cleaned the cupboard out and disposed of the rotting skins. I started to see the running round my kitchen.  I had my condo sprayed. This remedy the beetle problem but not the cockroaches. I have subsequently had it resprayed recently. I saved this specimen because it was nothing like anything I had ever seen. BTW I had tried to use natural remedies like borax and baking soda.  I think I see some powder on the beetle., when I magnify it.  I am totally grossed out.  Naomi

This is a nymph of a cockroach; it resembles one of a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (see http://tinyurl.com/hary6ge for an image), but I am not 100 percent certain. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

click beetle

click beetle

5850   Brampton, Ontario, Canada.  5 degrees Celsius outside, October 31st.  Found in a bedroom on a bed.  Crystal

This is a small click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae), simply an accidental intruder that will do no harm. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

crab spider

crab spider

5849 Hi, attached is a spider that I photographed today (Oct 29 2016 @ 4:06pm). It was outside (about 19c) on the pool leaf net. Body length about 0.11 in. or 2.8mm. Location Ajax, Ontario.   Frank

This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae); possibly in the genus Mecaphesa – see http://tinyurl.com/24kyg8b for an image. All crab spiders are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Pantry pest?

Pantry pest?

5848  I find between 10-20 of these on my bathroom floor (partial Basement) daily. It is a vinyl floor and relatively clean space. Please advise what these May be and how we can stop them?  Thanks.  Gurj

This is another example of something that I have seen before, but simply cannot pin a name on; it resembles something in the family Silvanidae or a close relative. I do not believe that it is a serious pest that you need worry about, but just in case, you might check your food storage areas for any signs of infestation. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Lady beetle pupa

Lady beetle pupa

5847   Clinton, Vancouver, BC This past summer, outside on our vehicles.

This is a pupa of a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

female orb-weaving spider

female orb-weaving spider

5846  Hello,  I am attaching a photo of a larger spider that was on the outside ‘side’ of our house….believe he must be some sort of garden spider? I have attached one photo of him taken inside a plastic cup. I set him free after taking the photo. This photo was in the fall season and in northern NE WA state.   Thank you,  Ellen

This is a female orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae). I cannot be certain because of the angle from which this image was taken, but I think that it may be in the genus Neoscona. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

broadfaced sac spider

broadfaced sac spider

5845   I was bit by this yesterday(Saturday Oct 29) Sandra.  Mitchell Ontario

This appears to be a broadfaced sac spider, Trachelas tranquillus, in the family Trachelidae. These are wandering spiders that do not spin a capture web, and occasionally wander indoors. They are reported to have a painful but not dangerous bite; see http://tinyurl.com/hlpmbbg for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

house centipede

house centipede

5844    This bug is about 1 inch in length and taken inside a store in Mississauga Ontario Canada.   thanks for identifying.  Michael Mississauga Ontario

This is a house centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata, a cosmopolitan species. Unlike most centipedes, these have relatively good eyesight, and will chase down some of their prey. They are reputed to have a painful (but not dangerous) bite; see http://tinyurl.com/mn7mzffor more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Assassin bug nymph

Assassin bug nymph

5843  Mainly green body with red striation along back. Someone suggested it was an assassin bug. May have come in with the dog.

This is indeed an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae; it is a nymph in the genus Zelus, likely Zelus luridus – see http://tinyurl.com/j7822h4 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Fruit fly?

Fruit fly?

5842    Can you tell me what kind of fly this is and the best way to get rid of them.  They come in the house in the fall and stay all winter. The problem started last fall. Donna

Although this fly superficially resembles some fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) in the genus Rhagoletis, I am by no means confident. I would like very much to see an image that shows the wing veins clearly, as well as knowing the geographic area where the image was taken. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Scuttle fly

Scuttle fly

5841    Hi, Please help identify. Seemed to be coming from floor drain. I thought they were fruit flies but they were not flying and seemed to move VERY fast on the floor. So fast I thought they were jumping. Size – Approx 1mm    Photo – 50x Magnification
Location – Canada – Niagara-on-the-lake, Ontario
Picture taken  Oct 27. Season – Regards,  Randy

This appears to be a scuttle fly (Diptera: Phoridae); see http://tinyurl.com/j7t4q6x for an example. Their larvae feed on decomposing organic matter, and the flies can become nuisance pests when they occur indoors. We often see them in our home, as we recycle vegetable scraps, which are an excellent food source for the fly larvae. See http://tinyurl.com/hs7upjt for some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

very common and widespread orb weaver species

very common and widespread orb weaver species

5840  Attached is a photo taken at our home in Miramichi, NB. It was taken on October 13 on an average sunny/cloudy day. The body of the spider was about 1 cm. across. It had constructed a web outside a main picture window at the front of our house (facing NW). It did not appear to be aggressive, staying in one spot as I got within a few inches to take the photo.  John

This is an orb weaver in the genus Araneus; it appears to be Araneus diadematus, a very common and widespread species on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. It is known as the cross spider or cross orb weaver in North America and the European garden spider in Europe. I saw several specimens in southern England while on a trip there earlier this month. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

long-jawed orb weaver spider

long-jawed orb weaver spider

5839   Found this summer in Muskoka, Ontario on a boat.  Body measures about 1 cm, spider is bright green.  Cheers, Ute

This is a long-jawed orb weaver (family Tetragnathidae); it looks like Tetragnatha viridis – see http://tinyurl.com/hakxrtkfor an image. These spiders usually are found near bodies of water, where they construct webs that more nearly are horizontal rather than vertical over or near the water surface. These all are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Dermestidae beetle shed skin.

Dermestidae beetle shed skin.

5838   This picture was taken in my room in Stratford Ontario. This is the second one I’ve found. Could you please help me in identifying it.  Rebecca 

This looks like the shed ‘skin’ (exoskeleton) of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (hide/skin/carpet/larder beetles, etc.) Just as a precaution, you might check areas where dry food products (including birds seed) and woolen clothing/fabrics are stored for signs of infestation. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Aphid

Aphid

5837   Good evening.  Found hundreds of these crawling on our back yard fence.  Calgary, Alberta.   Found today.  Yard has loads of vegetation.   The bug is very small, maybe 1/8 to ¼ inch, body is all black.   Rob

Like No. 5832, this is an aphid (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). All aphids are obligatory sap feeders, and in addition to any harm they may cause plants, they can be real nuisances as well from other standpoints. See http://tinyurl.com/jexmcaefor more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV

cockroach nymph

very young cockroach nymph

5836   Hi there, I recently (late October 2016) moved into a new apartment near Cobourg, Ontario. The last tenants were very messy and in the course of cleaning the cupboards I came across some of these. This was the largest specimen I found and the clearest shots I could take. Grateful for an ID if you have one. I am fighting them with insecticide. Justin

This is a very young nymph of a cockroach, possibly that of a German cockroach (Blattella germanica; Blattodea: Blattellidae). This species is notoriously difficult to control completely; see http://tinyurl.com/h3nd9z8  elsewhere on this site for some control suggestions.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

female hard tick

female hard tick

5835    My son had this in his hand in Belleville, on. We also have a dog.   Tammy.

This is an engorged female hard tick (family Ixodidae), but I cannot tell which species it might be. You may want to check your dog to see if it is carrying any more. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

carrion/sexton/burying beetle

carrion/sexton/burying beetle

5834   Hi – found the attached insect in back yard (Head Chezzetcook, NS) covered in tiny insects, maybe aphids.  Thought it was a wasp because of the yellow and black on the body which was hard to see, but now thinking might me some kind of beetle.  Hoping you can identify both insects.  Thanks,  Sherri

This is a carrion/sexton/burying beetle (Coleoptera: Silphidae) in the genus Nicrophorus that is absolutely covered with phoretic mites that are using the beetle as transportation to get to their next meal source. See No. 5821 for a similar example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Assassin (Kissing) Bug

Assassin (Kissing) Bug

5833 Found in Saskatchewan, also believe seen recently in Edmonton Alberta (inside buildings)  SCOTT

This appears to be an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) in the subfamily Triatominae; members of this subfamily collectively are known as cone-nose or kissing bugs and are obligate blood feeders. Your image bears some resemblance to Triatoma lecticularia, but you are hundreds of miles north of its known occurrence in North America. Any found in Canada likely would have arrived via commercial transport of some kind. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Aphid

Aphid

5832 I’m in Innisfil, Ontario. It is a mild October. This last week have had tiny all black, six legged (plus two antennae)bugs crawling all over my decks and brick and basement windows Not a hard beetle type shell and no wings.  Slow but steady pace when moving. They do not jump or scatter when threatened; they just stop or retreat. There are also present in the mulch in my gardens. Very small. And somewhat similar to picture #5526.  About 1/16th of an inch. Donna

This is an aphid (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). Also known as plant lice, these all feed on the sap of various plants and a few species can be important vectors of plant diseases. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

harmless boxelder bug

harmless boxelder bug

5831 Hi my name is Sarah and I have come across 2 bugs so far in my home both the same and I have no idea what it is , I was wondering if you could let me know what it is and is it harmful as in should I go to a doctor and get treated if someone got bit by one. I live in Sudbury Ontario.  This bug is about the size in between a nickel and a dime , it has red lines on its back, in the photo I have attached I appears to look like a fly but it had like a hard looking shell on its back with I wouldn’t say whiskers in the front of its face but one on each side of face. Thank you so much.   Sarah

This is a completely harmless boxelder bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Rhopalidae; Boisea sp.). These basically are nuisance pests that do little if any real harm – see http://tinyurl.com/pr9y98a for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Rove beetle

Rove beetle

5830   Hi I have been using stinky boards to capture roaming creatures into my garage. I get the usual wood bugs , millipedes and various spiders. This one to the left has me concerned. I have caught a few in the last month or two. Is this a termite ??

This is a rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae), these are general predators on other small arthropods, mostly other insects. Unlike most other beetles, the vast majority of rove beetles have very short wing covers and quite flexible abdomens. See http://tinyurl.com/zukwwvo for some examples. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Pink spotted lady beetles

Pink spotted lady beetles

5829 These “beetles” I’m assuming, seem to be everywhere amongst leaves and dark areas. We are located an hour outside Ottawa, Ontario area along water front. I’ve only recently,  noticed these and are finding them in a number of areas around our yard.

These are spotted (sometimes called pink-spotted) lady beetles, Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a very common and widespread species. See http://tinyurl.com/jf86263 for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

True fruit flies

True fruit flies

5828  I found this in Hamilton Ontario on my front porch. I wouldn’t have looked twice at it, but from a distance it looked like a small scorpion. Upon closer inspection, it was a flying insect camouflaged like a scorpion, which I find strange, since there are no native scorpion species in this area. –Dan

Flies with this type of wing pattern usually belong to the family Tephritidae (true fruit flies); see http://tinyurl.com/j89kmhs for an example. I have seen it posited that this wing pattern may serve to mimic jumping spiders, common predators on these flies. Some species can be very serious orchard pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

ambush bugs

ambush bugs

5827  Found these two in my yard in Brantford Ontario this past summer. Wondering what they are.  Scott.

These are ambush bugs (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae; subfamily Phymatinae). They lay in wait on vegetation, especially flowers, for potential meals to come close enough to grab. They are capable of overpowering prey items much larger than themselves. See http://tinyurl.com/ngzv3nn for more detailed information,  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

 5826  The photo was taken in Mississauga, Ont. on Oct.11/16. The bug is dead, my husband found it crawling on the wall upstairs in our house and squished it, so a leg or two might not be showing up but I think the photos are fairly clear. I hope you can identify it and let me know what it is and if I need to do anything to eliminate any future visits by its friends.  Thanks so much.  June

This is a broad-nose/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. See nos. 5781, 5779, and 5774 for other examples. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

5825   Hi there – some relatives are currently in Lourmarin in the South of France and the came across this little creature.   Just wondering if you might know what it is – or how I might find out. Thanks so much, Kathy

This is a mature caterpillar of an oleander hawkmoth, Daphnis nerii (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae); see Daphnis nerii – Wikipedia
Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Winged ant

Winged ant

5824   What is this? Darrin

This appears to be a winged ant of some sort, but this image is not clear enough to say much more. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Cockroach nymph

Cockroach nymph

5823   I live in Montreal, Quebec, in a basement apartment. It was raining when this thing appeared in my living room. It’s about the size of my fingernail (about 1-2 cm) I trapped it in a small mason jar until I could identify it. I really hope it’s not a cockroach because my place is meticulously clean and I’ve never had to deal with that before. Thanks,  Jennifer

This is indeed a nymph of a cockroach, but I cannot say exactly which species. At least it is not a German cockroach, which is both a very common and somewhat difficult to control species. Cockroaches are very adaptable creatures, and their presence is no indicator of any lack of cleanliness. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

scarlet malachite beetle larva

scarlet malachite beetle larva

5822  Hi there,  I’m Greg and live in Edmonton. A week ago moved in to the new duplex. I realized that every day was finding an insect at home in different locations like a bathroom, walk in closet, kitchen and this morning even in my daughter bed. I didn’t met this gays before so have no idea what to do. It has around 10 – 15mm long. I’m sending you 2 pictures with it. Thx for any advice, Greg.

This is a larva of a scarlet malachite beetle, Malachius aeneus (Coleoptera: Melyridae) – see http://tinyurl.com/khegf6s for detailed information. This is not a pest, but simply an accidental intruder. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

burying/sexton beetle

burying/sexton beetle

5821  Found this trying to fly on a warm sunny day on Quadra Island BC. I can’t identify the large insect but assume mites are on his/her back.  The mites if that’s what they are eventually killed the larger insect after an hour or so of serious torment.

This is a burying/sexton beetle (Coleoptera: Silphidae) in the genus Nicrophorus. The little red critters are mites that are using the beetle as transportation (a phenomenon known as phoresy) to get to their next meal source – see http://tinyurl.com/gumcmra for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

western conifer seed bug

Harmless western conifer seed bug

5820   My name is Erin. I found this bug in my apartment in Nova Scotia, Canada. I have been waking up with bug bites the last few weeks (September). On Thursday October 6 I woke up with a bite on my hand and one on my pinky, hand was swollen and red and bite was extremely itchy. My boyfriend found the first bug dead under his pillow. I then found another one dead underneath our dresser. From my research it looks like kissing bug or assassin bug. I’m scared that I may have contracted Chagas’ disease.  Emerg doctors wouldn’t do anything/test my blood. September was really warm and our building in general is quite warm/humid.  

This would not cause any bites, it’s a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, a harmless nuisance pest in the family Coreidae. These commonly enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there; see http://tinyurl.com/ybmonu3 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

moth in the family Alucitidae

moth in the family Alucitidae

5819   This moth is about 1 cm wide. They are new to our farmhouse and are small enough to wiggle into the house past the edges of the screens on the windows.  They are attracted to the nightlight so I have counted 10 in our bathroom in the morning.  When I kill them they are fragile and leave a dust smear on the wall.  They are quite lively if you don’t grab them quickly and they will fly away.  I live in northeastern Alberta Canada.  As I mentioned, I have never seen these before this summer and I have been unable to identify them on any website.  Can you tell me what they are and what their source might be so I can deal with them?   Catherine

This is a moth in the family Alucitidae (many-plumed moths); likely Alucita montana – see http://tinyurl.com/h8fz34q for more detailed information. These are not pests, their larvae likely are leaf and flower miners of snowberry (Symphoricarpos spp.). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.