Thousands of pest photos submitted for identification.

blow fly maggot

blow fly maggot

5874   Hi,I’d like some help in identifying the attached pics of larvae. They are dropping out of a pot light located in my bathroom – about 1-2 every couple of hours. The only place above the bathroom ceiling is an attic. (which contains only insulation as far as I know, since there is no interior access) They started dropping down two days ago.  I live in Comox, Vancouver Island, BC.   When I took the light bulb out, nothing is visible. Should I be taking down the whole light fixture?   I have seen no moths anywhere and I’ve checked out my pantry and it appears bug-free. All the dry goods are in plastic containers.If you can identify these, can you tell me how to get rid of them? Thank you. Dianne Alsop

This looks like a maggot, probably a blow fly maggot that has crawled away from a dead animal in your attic. There could be a dead rat near the pot light. You should have a professional inspect, disinfect and remove any dead rodents.  If you have been using rodent poison, you should switch to traps to avoid more dead rodents in your home.  See the life cycle of blow flies here: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/visibleproofs/galleries/technologies/blowfly.html

5873

5873

5873   Hi, my name is Bianca-Rose and i live in Hearst, Ontario, Canada and i found this insect in my work place, specifically in a motel room bathroom. I’m hoping you can tell me what it is.it was about an inch long, head to tail. Thank you for your time.

5872

5872

5872   This an apple tree sapling in Rockland Cty. New York.  The weather is turning cool.  The tree is about 2 feet tall. There appears to be some type of bug lined up on the stem. Would like to know what they are.  Thanks, Ann

globular springtails

globular springtails

5871   Thousands of these showed up all over my farm fence today. Seems that touching them makes them jump. They are very small. I live in South Western BC, near Vancouver. It is November and we have just had a lot of rain and wind.

These are globular springtails (Collembola: Dicyrtomidae); possibly in the genus Ptenothrix – see http://tinyurl.com/zstplzs for an example. These basically are scavengers that do not appear to be pests in the sense of causing any damage/harm, but may be considered nuisances when they occur in large numbers. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

western-conifer-seed-bug

5870

5870    Cockroaches?  Found around bottom of A/C in window of suite in Sidney, BC, CANADA

This is a western conifer seed bug.  It is one of the most common insect photos submitted for identification.

 

cockroach nymph

cockroach nymph

5869   I’ve had a German roach problem and exterminators came about 2 weeks ago (late October) but this bug does not look like any roach I’ve seen.  This one is dead and found near my electric kettle. I live in Montreal in a studio apartment. Note the small pincer like thing at the rear. Ps. each line on that paper is about 1/4 inch apart 

This cockroach nymph is so shriveled up as to make a positive I.D. a bit difficult, but I believe that I can still make out some faint markings on its thorax that point in the direction of it being a German cockroach. Sorry… Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

ground beetle

ground beetle

5868   Hi, I live in Washington state and found this bug at night under some maple leaves outside. I have never seen anything like this. Thank you.

This is a larva of a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae); see http://tinyurl.com/hc9ts8x for an image of an adult along with a larva. These all are general predators on other terrestrial arthropods, mainly other insects. Your specimen is one of the fattest examples that I’ve ever seen! Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

mealybug

mealybug

5867   My name is Nigel and I live in Oshawa Ontario.  These pics were taken in our house.  The bugs appear year round. These are white “insects” about 2mm in length, white, and keep appearing on our Phalaeonopsis orchids.

This looks like a mealybug (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Pseudococcidae); there are several species of mealybugs that will infest orchids, see http://tinyurl.com/ha6ra8p for more detailed information, including some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Indian meal moth caterpillar

Indian meal moth caterpillar

5866  I found this 1cm larvae crawling up the wall in the kitchen of my townhouse. I live on Vancouver Island, BC. Thanks. 

This most likely is a caterpillar of an Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).These caterpillars will feed on a very wide variety of stored food products, including grain-based meals, dried fruit, nuts, bird seed, etc., so you should inspect all your food storage areas for signs of infestation. See http://tinyurl.com/zhgsj23 for more detailed information, including some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

broad-nose/short-snouted weevil

5865    Hi! I am hoping someone can identify this bug for me in Edmonton,  Alberta.    Not to lead the answer but a friend has bedbugs and just thought I would take a good look in my house and found this in a plastic bin under my bed.  Thanks for your help with this!   Rebecca

This is a broad-nose/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. See nos. 5826, 5781, 5779, and 5774 for other examples. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

dark-winged fungus gnat

dark-winged fungus gnat

5864   Hey it’s Cal from Calgary, Alberta. I’ve killed about 50 of these little flies in my bedroom every day for the past week. I live in a basement apartment and I can’t find out where they’re coming from! Can you provide any help with identifying these guys?

This is a dark-winged fungus gnat (Diptera: Sciaridae). They basically are nuisance pests whose larvae are found primarily in very damp/wet soils having a high organic content, where they sometimes will damage tender roots and other underground parts of plants. If you have indoor potted plants of any kind, allow the soil to dry out as much as practical between waterings. See http://tinyurl.com/hrgsoqh for more detailed information. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Wingless Moth

Wingless Moth

5863  Hello.   My name is Dianna. I have searched your site as well as the internet and have had no luck identifying this bug. Numerous appeared on the brick walls on outside of my home a week or two ago (1st-2nd week if November 2016). They have no wings and hardly move when touched.  The strange thing about them is at night their tail ends curl up! They seem to have more movement at night as well. I thought maybe stink bug nymph but does not have a shield shape. Hoping you can help! Want to get rid of them.

This is a wingless moth; it appears to be a female fall cankerworm, Alsophila pometaria (Lepidoptera: Geometridae). See http://tinyurl.com/ztznohq for an image and http://tinyurl.com/puv2ssy for detailed information on its life history. Their larvae feed on leaves of trees in the springtime; this would be the best time to apply control measures. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Assassin Bug Nymph

Assassin Bug Nymph

5862   This bug was inside my step son shirt in the arm pit and bit him.  The bite left a welt like a bee sting and he said it felt like 2 bees stinging him.  Eastern Washington.

This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), likely that of Reduvius personatus, a peridomestic species known as the masked hunter. These are reported as having a very painful but not dangerous bite. See http://tinyurl.com/23g4bdy for more detailed information. Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Jerusalem cricket

Jerusalem cricket

5861   My is Kaisa and we found this insect in Pendleton, Oregon. My students and I found this very interesting insect in a park near the end of October. The climate here is high desert, it’s very dry with low temperatures at night and in the 60s during the day, although we have been having a wet fall this year.  We found the insect by the side of the road near a rocky hillside and it was dead when we found it. I believe it is some sort of cricket but couldn’t find an exact match.  Kaisa,  6th Grade Teacher.

This is a relative of grasshoppers and crickets known as a Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae). See http://tinyurl.com/cjs9zgv for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

female blister beetle

female blister beetle

5860  Taken in backyard London Ontario Canada today.  Nov 10 2016 at about 1 pm.  Joanne

This is a female blister beetle (Coleoptera: Meloidae) in the genus Meloe; beetles in this genus often are called oil beetles because of the oily fluid they exude from their joints when they are handled roughly. This fluid contains cantharidin, a chemical that can cause blistering on tender skin. See http://tinyurl.com/z5tg72eor more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Earwig

Earwig

5859  Hi I’m Shannon and I have been finding these bugs regularly on the main level of my home in Kitimat, BC. The odd time, I have also discovered a few on the outside Windows or along the house. I have noticed them year-round, I believe, if I can recall correctly. But sometimes my memory doesn’t serve me well so I can say I’ve definitely noticed them in summer, fall and now getting into winter.  I am wondering what this is so I can research if they provide a big threat of infestation that would need to be dealt with. Thank you for any help in identifying it.

This is an earwig (order Dermaptera), possibly a European earwig, Forficula auricularia; see http://tinyurl.com/h97cy58 for an image. Earwigs seldom do any real harm, and may even be of some benefit in the garden, as they will feed on the eggs and young of other insects. See http://tinyurl.com/h5m54vn for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

5858  Hello.   Can you help me identify this bug found in my bedroom of my fourth floor apartment on Nov 1, 2016 in Calgary, AB. See attached. Thank you.  Charles 

This is a relative of grasshoppers and crickets known as a cave or camel cricket (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae). Some people also call them ‘sprickets’ because of a fancied resemblance to a cross between a spider and a cricket. These insects prefer relatively dark, damp, and undisturbed habitats, such as caves and basements; finding one on the fourth floor of a building would seem a bit unusual for them. They basically are nuisance pests that seldom cause any real harm. See http://tinyurl.com/guowjr7 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Dermestidae Beetle Larva

Dermestidae Beetle Larva

5857   Hello.   I found two of these bugs on the wall above my bed.  Any help would be great! Thank you.   Karen

This looks like a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (hide/skin/larder/carpet beetles and allies), possibly in the genus Anthrenus – see http://tinyurl.com/z3oqpsv for an example and http://tinyurl.com/zl9w25c elsewhere on this site for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Stink bug

Stink bug

5856  I found this very hard bodied beetle strolling across my bedroom floor near Leduc, Alberta.  Size of the body is just under 2 cm.  In normal light it is very dark, almost black.  Thank you for letting me know what it is and if I have to be concerned.   Thanks. Esther

This appears to be a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), but it does not look to me like any of the species known to be native to your area. Are you by any chance in an area where international shipments arrive? All that aside, this insect will not damage anything in your home.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Sow bug

Harmless sow bug

5855  Hello, looking to identify this bug and get rid of it. My name is Loay and live in Mississauga Ontario. It’s October so it’s somewhat chilly around 1 – 10 degrees Celsius. I found them indoors (including the basement) and outdoors around main entrances.

This is a harmless sowbug.  They have gills which need constant moisture, so they tend to live in moister climates. They are primarily nocturnal, and eat decaying leaf litter and vegetable matter.    Read more about these common and abundant creatures.      Their presence indoors indicates a serious moisture problem.

Phorid flies

Phorid flies

5854    Good day,  Recently my basement bedroom and bathroom have become a hangout to tiny black flies. I can’t figure out where they’re coming from or even what they are.    They rally around the exterior windows when its light out, and then after that are found around other sources of light. A candle burning all night in the bathroom usually kills a dozen or so (bodies found in the wax).   They aren’t attracted to vinegar or alcohol, spraying them with Windex seems to kill them, but they will return to that same window after it was cleaned. They currently number under 20 in each window. But when vacuumed up or killed they return to that number within half an hour.    We noticed them after summer, in Nova Scotia, Canada. Its now November and they’re still here.  I’ve taken a photo of some, can you identify what they are? And how to get rid of them!

These are likelyPhorid flies, also known as humpbacked flies.  They are small  and resemble fruit flies in appearance.  The Phorid fly lacks the red eye color that is the classic trademark of the fruit fly.  Phorid flies are in the small category of flies, measuring up to 1/8 inch in length, including the wings. Color:  Tan brown with black eyes; small head; a severely arched (humpbacked) thorax when viewed from the side. Read More

 

woolly aphid

woolly aphid

5853   Hello.  I live just outside Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia. For the past number of days there have been these rather SMALL whitish bugs flying around. First thought it was pollen floating by … but they are a flying bug. Looks more white in the air but have a blueish (neon) glow. Some got caught in a web and when I removed them they appeared to be more blue. A number of friends have also commented on my personal FB page that they too have seen them and are curious to know what they are. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Regards, Janet 

This is a woolly aphid (Hemiptera/ Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae; subfamily Eriosomatinae), see http://tinyurl.com/jugtw2r for images and more detailed information on their life history. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Snail eating ground beetle

Snail eating ground beetle

5852    Hi there, Saw this on my way to Victoria BC at Goldstream National Park. What is it??   Taylor.

This is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) that specializes in snail-eating, it appears to be Scaphinotus angusticollis – see http://tinyurl.com/6vj9qb8 for an image and details on its life history. Nice find! Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

nymph of a cockroach

nymph of a cockroach

5851   I discovered these bugs on a shelf in my cupboard . It happened at the beginning of September when I found cockroaches and started cleaning my food cupboards out. I had inadvertently left banana skins In a plastic bag and they somehow got pushed into a cupboard. There were these beetles quite different from the cockroaches. After I cleaned the cupboard out and disposed of the rotting skins. I started to see the running round my kitchen.  I had my condo sprayed. This remedy the beetle problem but not the cockroaches. I have subsequently had it resprayed recently. I saved this specimen because it was nothing like anything I had ever seen. BTW I had tried to use natural remedies like borax and baking soda.  I think I see some powder on the beetle., when I magnify it.  I am totally grossed out.  Naomi

This is a nymph of a cockroach; it resembles one of a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (see http://tinyurl.com/hary6ge for an image), but I am not 100 percent certain. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

click beetle

click beetle

5850   Brampton, Ontario, Canada.  5 degrees Celsius outside, October 31st.  Found in a bedroom on a bed.  Crystal

This is a small click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae), simply an accidental intruder that will do no harm. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

crab spider

crab spider

5849 Hi, attached is a spider that I photographed today (Oct 29 2016 @ 4:06pm). It was outside (about 19c) on the pool leaf net. Body length about 0.11 in. or 2.8mm. Location Ajax, Ontario.   Frank

This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae); possibly in the genus Mecaphesa – see http://tinyurl.com/24kyg8b for an image. All crab spiders are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Pantry pest?

Pantry pest?

5848  I find between 10-20 of these on my bathroom floor (partial Basement) daily. It is a vinyl floor and relatively clean space. Please advise what these May be and how we can stop them?  Thanks.  Gurj

This is another example of something that I have seen before, but simply cannot pin a name on; it resembles something in the family Silvanidae or a close relative. I do not believe that it is a serious pest that you need worry about, but just in case, you might check your food storage areas for any signs of infestation. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Lady beetle pupa

Lady beetle pupa

5847   Clinton, Vancouver, BC This past summer, outside on our vehicles.

This is a pupa of a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

female orb-weaving spider

female orb-weaving spider

5846  Hello,  I am attaching a photo of a larger spider that was on the outside ‘side’ of our house….believe he must be some sort of garden spider? I have attached one photo of him taken inside a plastic cup. I set him free after taking the photo. This photo was in the fall season and in northern NE WA state.   Thank you,  Ellen

This is a female orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae). I cannot be certain because of the angle from which this image was taken, but I think that it may be in the genus Neoscona. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

broadfaced sac spider

broadfaced sac spider

5845   I was bit by this yesterday(Saturday Oct 29) Sandra.  Mitchell Ontario

This appears to be a broadfaced sac spider, Trachelas tranquillus, in the family Trachelidae. These are wandering spiders that do not spin a capture web, and occasionally wander indoors. They are reported to have a painful but not dangerous bite; see http://tinyurl.com/hlpmbbg for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

house centipede

house centipede

5844    This bug is about 1 inch in length and taken inside a store in Mississauga Ontario Canada.   thanks for identifying.  Michael Mississauga Ontario

This is a house centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata, a cosmopolitan species. Unlike most centipedes, these have relatively good eyesight, and will chase down some of their prey. They are reputed to have a painful (but not dangerous) bite; see http://tinyurl.com/mn7mzffor more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Assassin bug nymph

Assassin bug nymph

5843  Mainly green body with red striation along back. Someone suggested it was an assassin bug. May have come in with the dog.

This is indeed an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae; it is a nymph in the genus Zelus, likely Zelus luridus – see http://tinyurl.com/j7822h4 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Fruit fly?

Fruit fly?

5842    Can you tell me what kind of fly this is and the best way to get rid of them.  They come in the house in the fall and stay all winter. The problem started last fall. Donna

Although this fly superficially resembles some fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) in the genus Rhagoletis, I am by no means confident. I would like very much to see an image that shows the wing veins clearly, as well as knowing the geographic area where the image was taken. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.