Thousands of pest photos submitted for identification.

6173

6173  Hello,  I live in Burlington, Ontario and I found a very small worm/caterpillar on the wall. Can you ID it for me? It moved very slowly in a wave-like manner. Pics are attached. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks    RM.

 

6172

6172  Attached is a photo of possible bug eggs that were found beneath a baseboard heater in Ottawa, ON. The bottom of the heater is very dusty but these “eggs” were not which suggests that they are new, although this is unknown. It is currently November and there is snow on the ground. These “eggs” were found indoors. They are about the size and shape of popcorn kernels. It is also unknown what the two larger objects are (the long one on the carpet on the bottom left and the one on the baseboard heater on the top right). Please let me know if any of these look familiar. Thanks. Erin

 

6171

R/sir,
myself:   shriram
crop: cotton
month: November
weather: low temp 20 degree c.

 

Buprestid Beetle

6170  Hello & please help Identify the attached larva;  The hole in the oak floor is where the larva was found. White powder sawdust was removed with an air blast and the larva was coaxed out by injecting wasp foam spray into the bore hole about 3-1/4” long. The home is located between Brantford and Paris Ontario.  Thanks;   Gord

Yellow mealworm beetle pupa

Yellow mealworm beetle pupa

6169   This 6 legged insect may have entered my house on a jacket  that was left outside overnight.  Two days ago it seemed lifeless after my cat discovered it, soft, moist and pale like shrimp but now it’s segments are dry and more solid… then it wiggled when handled for the photo so perhaps I’ll return it to the thickets once this rain lets up.  I hope you might be able to identify it as friendly and native to my area?  Mild in October, near a mix of wooded swamp and wild fields in Trenton, Ontario.

This is a pupa of a beetle; likely that of a yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor; Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae); see https://tinyurl.com/yaa2l9g3 for an image. These beetles are cosmopolitan in distribution, and sometimes can be pests in stored grains, especially those that have been damaged by excess moisture. See https://tinyurl.com/puwfch2 for detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

western conifer seed bug

western conifer seed bug

6168     Found inside and out, mainly spring and fall.  They all look to be of same size and colouring.  Property near tidal water.  Thanks,  Mark.

This is a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). These often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. See https://tinyurl.com/ybmonu3 for detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

ant-like flower beetle

ant-like flower beetle

6167  This specimen was caught in a bug trap (baited with black and varied carpet beetle pheromone and a food pellet), placed in a carpeted lunchroom near a wall and a radiator. We collected this specimen on October 23, 2017 (specimen was likely caught in trap within the last week). Our geographical location is Burlington Ontario.  Thanks,  Corey.  Botany Intern, Royal Botanical Gardens

This looks like an ant-like flower beetle (Coleoptera: Anthicidae); see https://tinyurl.com/yar8cj9z for an example. Some of these will infest stored grains and dried fruit; see https://tinyurl.com/yajgg7t6 for detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

female orb-weaving spider

female orb-weaving spider

6166 Hello I would greatly appreciate it if you could help me identify this spider thank you.  Nicola

This is a very well-fed (and likely gravid) female orb-weaving spider in the genus Araneus, likely A. diadematus, a very common and widespread species in the northern hemisphere. In North America, it usually is called a cross spider whereas in Europe, it usually is called the European garden spider. See https://tinyurl.com/mfwo8t2 for more detailed information  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

saw-toothed grain beetles

saw-toothed grain beetles

6165  Can you please identify the insects in these photos. They have infested my kitchen and I would like to know how to be rid of them. Thanks.

These appear to be saw-toothed grain beetles, Oryzaephilus surinamensis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae). These beetles and their close cousins merchant grain beetles (O. mercator) are cosmopolitan pests of dry stored food products. See https://tinyurl.com/lodnxbs for more detailed information including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

click beetle

click beetle

6164   Found this live bug this morning (5:30am) on my bathroom mat, I am location in Brampton, Ontario, Canada.  Legs would tuck in when prodded, then after few seconds get up and move.  Moves pretty quickly.  Size is approx 4mm from tip of head (not antennae) to backend.  The weather is just starting to here to single digits (celcius) in the morning.  I have seen this bug dead before (about 5 of them) in the bedroom near the mattress, and once on the mattress when I was changing the sheets, they were all dead.  Would like to know what this bug is and if I need to take action.  With kind regards,   Amy

This is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae), it appears to be in the genus Aeolus – see https://tinyurl.com/y8lo5jr7 for an example. These simply are accidental intruders that will do no harm.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

red-cross shield bug

red-cross shield bug

6163    This was on the roof inside our holiday trailer on August 28, 2017.  It was about 5/8” in length and 3/8” wide.  When my husband picked it off the ceiling he said it wouldn’t “squish” in between his fingers because the body was hard.  We were camping at Tunnel Mountain Campground, in Banff, Alberta.  Neither of us have seen a bug like this before, so thank you for identifying it for us.   Mary and Garry

This appears to be a red-cross shield bug, Elasmostethus cruciatus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Acanthosomatidae); see https://tinyurl.com/ybfqbwfy for an image. They appear to feed primarily on alder trees. These are very close relatives to true stink bugs in the family Pentatomidae, and sometimes may be mistaken for one of those.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

oil beetle, a type of blister beetle

oil beetle, a type of blister beetle

6162   Hi.  This beetle was found in field behind my house on a sunny day during mid-October.  I live in Port Elgin, Ontario.  I don’t remember ever seeing this beetle before and didn’t see it on your website.  The beetle is fairly large at around 3.5 cm long.   My son has suggested that it may be an Oil beetle. Please confirm.  Andy.  Port Elgin, ON

This is indeed an oil beetle, a type of blister beetle (Coleoptera: Meloidae) in the genus Meloe. They are called oil beetles because of their habit of exuding an oily fluid (their equivalent of blood) from between their joints when handled roughly. This fluid contains a chemical (cantharidin) that can cause blisters on tender skin. See https://tinyurl.com/y7jhuhrq for more information.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

brown prionid

brown prionid

6161   Please help with ID of this guy. My son found him already dead. It looks like a borer of some kind but I cannot find it online anywhere.  We live on the edge of a wooded area, and just received a load of wood from a local source in the last 2 weeks.  Thanks, Jennifer.   Just outside of Greater Kingston Area, Ontario, Canada.

This appears to be a brown prionid, Orthosoma brunneum (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), see https://tinyurl.com/y7tpzvhg for an image. Their larvae bore in damp/rotting wood, usually that in contact with soil; they are not destructive. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

house centipede

house centipede

6160   Location: Valleyfield, Quebec, Canada.  Place fund: book store, build on a concrete slab.  We had the insects showed in post 5612.  But they evolve into this and they still move really fast.   They now measure about 5cm long and when they flee they’re about 2cm tall.   We would like to know what are those bugs and can they bite or damage any goods in the store ?   There is no food, it’s a book store.  Thank you.  Rachel O.

This is a house centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata (Chilopoda: Scutigeromorpha), a peridomestic species having a very wide distribution. They cause no damage, but feed on other arthropods that they happen across. Although the house centipede is capTable of biting a human, this seldom occurs, and the effect of a bite reportedly is no worse than a minor bee sting. See https://tinyurl.com/mn7mzf for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

robber flies

robber flies

6159     What is this??   mating strange pair!  Holly

These are robber flies (Diptera: Asilidae); likely in the genus Promachus – see https://tinyurl.com/yddn9x4h for an example. Robber flies are ambush predators that simply wait until a potential meal flies/wanders into striking distance. They then fly out, nab their victim, and bring it back to their perch for a leisurely meal.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

German cockroach

German cockroach

6158  This has been found in a townhouse unit multiple have been present they have antennas and are a winged species but not recognized to fly, medium brown in color resemble a grasshopper in the legs, it has travelled through ventilation to other units as well, any suggestive information to identify would be greatly appreciated. 

This is a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Ectobiidae), a peridomestic species that is notoriously difficult to control in multiple-unit dwellings. See https://tinyurl.com/h3nd9z8 elsewhere on this site for some cockroach control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

eye-spotted lady beetle

eye-spotted lady beetle

6157   Hi. I am in Paradise, NL. I found this crawling  on my siding. Way bigger than a ladybug.

This is an eye-spotted lady beetle, Anatis mali (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae); see https://tinyurl.com/y8mfo6r9 for an image. Lady beetles in the genus Anatis are among the largest found in North America; I recall being very impressed by the ones I found on our North Dakota farm some 60 years ago.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Assassin bug nymph

Assassin bug nymph

6156  Hello I just killed this bug in our child’s room in Toronto, Please note the little spots on the back. Please help! Richard 

This is a nymph of Reduvius personatus, an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as a masked hunter. This is an introduced species likely of European origin that is frequently found indoors where it feeds on the insects and other arthropods it finds there. It is reported to have a very painful (but not dangerous) bite; see https://tinyurl.com/23g4bdy for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Australian cockroach nymph

Australian cockroach nymph

6155 I found this in a drawer in our house in Halifax Nova Scotia. Can you please identify and tell me if I need to be concerned. Thanks.  Ray

This appears to be a nymph of an Australian cockroach, Periplaneta australasiae (Blattodea: Blattidae), a peridomestic species found in many areas of eastern North America. See https://tinyurl.com/h3nd9z8 elsewhere on this site for some cockroach control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

click beetle

click beetle

6154  Hello,  Found this 5mm long insect (photos attached) indoors in Southern Ontario this month (Oct)   Any idea what it is?  Adam

This is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae), possibly in the genus Aeolus – see https://tinyurl.com/y8lo5jr7 for an example. Just an accidental intruder, it will do no harm.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Boxelder bug

Boxelder bugs

Hello, Could you tell me what these are and if they are something I need to be worried about. Sam

6153  These are boxelder bugs. In the fall they may crawl into cracks and cavities around a home seeking shelter from winter. They are a nuisance but not harmful. For more information see: http://pestcontrolcanada.com/box-elder-bugs

 

male drumming katydid

male drumming katydid

6152    Hi,   I’m curious if you might be able to identify this insect. The picture was taken late August 2017 in the Vancouver, BC Canada area. The insect seemed to have sticky pads of some type on it’s “feet”, as it wouldn’t easily come loose when the cup was repeatedly shaken/banged outside, until it flung (didn’t fly) and stuck/grasped against the side of the nearby house about 4’ away.    Any help would be appreciated.   Thanks,  Jason

This appears to be a male drumming katydid,  Meconema thalassinum (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae); see https://tinyurl.com/yd9ylbvp for an image. This is a European species that has been introduced into North America; in Europe, it is known as the oak bush-cricket.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

eastern giant crane fly

eastern giant crane fly

6151   Cindy from Val Caron, Ontario, Canada.  Photo taken October 7th 2017.

This is an eastern giant crane fly, Pedicia albivitta (Diptera: Tipulidae), see https://tinyurl.com/yaap923k for an image. They are completely harmless.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

banded tussock moth caterpillar

banded tussock moth caterpillar

6150   I found this caterpillar in Weldon Park in London, Ontario a week ago (late September). Is it a banded tussock? I’m curious to know what the white things are on it’s back.  Kelly

This does appear to be a banded tussock moth caterpillar (Halysidota tessellaris; Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae). The white objects are the cocoons spun by larvae of a parasitic wasp (likely a braconid in the subfamily Microgastrinae) that developed within the body of the caterpillar. When the larvae are fully grown, they chew through the cuticle of the caterpillar and then spin a cocoon that protects them during their pupal stage. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Black vine weevil

Black vine weevil

I am from Toronto, I found this thing walking around my bedroom. It is about one cm. 

6149  This is a short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae), likely a black vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus).  Adults will occasionally invade homes but they cause no harm there. See http://tinyurl.com/monvaej for detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

caterpillar of a swallowtail butterfly

caterpillar of a swallowtail butterfly

I came home from work today to find this little guy crawling on the side of our house! Any idea what it is?  Thanks Dave

This is a caterpillar of a swallowtail butterfly (Lepidoptera: Paplionidae) in the genus Papilio; see https://tinyurl.com/y7c8pns8 for an example. These caterpillars often change from green to brown as they get ready to pupate.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

rodent bot fly

rodent bot fly

6148    Found in interior BC near Nelson in August.  Approximately 1.25 inches long (large).  Unable to identify.  Lauren 

This is a rodent bot fly (Diptera: Oestridae; Cuterebra sp.). Their larvae develop under the skin of several species of rodents; the adult flies lack functional mouthparts and are harmless. See https://tinyurl.com/ybftn3ff for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

golden buprestid beetle

golden buprestid beetle

6147   I’m from Parksville, B.C. I found this dead bug burrowed in my carport wood beam also when removing a rotted piece from a beam I found a larvae. Here I thought termites were my biggest problem. I had already squirted some termidor poison in all the visible holes, I also removed a sunflower seed they must have used as a plug. What are my options?

This is Buprestis aurulenta, a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) sometimes called the golden buprestid or jewel beetle. This species can spend a remarkably long time in its larval stages; see https://tinyurl.com/ycs5h2sj for detailed information. At this point, there is no useful control option; see https://tinyurl.com/yakc6r4x for details.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius

larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius

6146   This is some kind of beetle, but I’ve never seen it before. Found indoors in Saskatchewan today (Oct. 3). The photo is taken on the dining table, so please excuse the grainy background.  Lisa 

This is a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), a cosmopolitan pantry pest. See https://tinyurl.com/nw92wz  for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

brown marmorated stink bug

6145  We are finding the bug on our window. I have pleaded blinds in the front window and they are crawling I’m the pleats. They are half a inch or three quarters of a inch they have wings and are brown with a light stomach. 

This is a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), an introduced species that has become a pest in much of North America. See https://tinyurl.com/nkexo3 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

long-horned wood-boring beetle

long-horned wood-boring beetle

6143  What is it, I found it hiding on my porch.

This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae, it looks like Tragosoma depsarium; see http://tinyurl.com/y7g53rba for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Slug, snail, chrysalis?

6142   I didn’t see anything else like this odd little thing on your site. It was found at Victoria Beach, Manitoba, in August (summer), outdoors on a nice day – 25-ish degrees Celsius. Thanks for looking at it – your site is great.  Ida

I cannot tell for certain what this is – if it was moving and very soft in texture, it would be a slug, a shelless mollusk related to snails. If it was hard to the touch and immobile, it might be a chrysalis of a small butterfly. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

metallic wood-boring beetle

metallic wood-boring beetle

6141  My name is Diane. I am 10 years old.
I found this insect: 
Outside,  Sunny day,  July 21, 2017 (summer)
Geography (Orleans / Ottawa area) very near the Ottawa river
The insect looks a bit like bark off of a tree. Grey in colour.
The insect from tail to head (not including the antennae) is 3.4 cms long.
He seemed like a pretty friendly little critter 😊
Diane

This is a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae); it looks like a member of the genus Chalcophora – see http://tinyurl.com/yawxrvbw for an example and additional information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.