Thousands of pest photos submitted for identification.

snakefly larva

snakefly larva

5906  Hello,   Can you advise what the attached Bug is ?  Came out of Vancouver BC.   Thanks.  Brendan. 

This is a larva of a snakefly (order Raphidioptera); likely in the family Raphidiidae. These are general predators on other small arthropods, mainly other insects. See http://tinyurl.com/hht3z5u for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

grain/granary weevil

grain/granary weevil

5905   Found in large numbers in an apartment crawling on the floors and walls. I am in Saskatoon, SK and it has been very cold outside recently. Does not appear to be coming from any singular location (found in living room, bedroom, kitchen, bathroom). I have only found concentrated areas (10 bugs) in small piles in the corner of windowsills, but they were all dead. I have checked my indoor potted plants, but have found no evidence of them. I guess they have a chitinous exoskeleton since they crunch between your fingernail and a hard surface. They are about 4mm long. They seem to be attracted to lamp when the rest of the room is dark. When you pick them up they “play dead”, that is, they curl up all their legs into themselves and lie motionless for 5-10 seconds.  Thanks for your consideration.  Ian

This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), it looks like one of the grain/granary weevils in the genus Sitophilus – see http://tinyurl.com/hl8fkt9 for an example. You should check all food storage areas where you keep dry food items (including bird seed), especially seeds of wheat, rice, or corn (maize), for signs of infestation. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

lacewing

lacewing

5904   Hello Webmanager, My name is Jack and I found this creature on the mirrored backsplash in our kitchen. We’re in central Alabama where the weather is currently unseasonably warm (70°).
Best regards,  Jack

This is a lacewing, most likely a green lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). These insects and their larvae are voracious predators on small, soft-bodied insects such as aphids and small caterpillars, and thus usually considered as beneficial. See http://tinyurl.com/hjlw5ts for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

long-horned wood-boring beetle

long-horned wood-boring beetle

5903  What is this ?  It came out of my wood table I think….Kind regards,  Jeff

This looks like a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the tribe Clytini – see http://tinyurl.com/jefsb3t for an example. It would be very unlikely for this to have emerged from any finished piece of furniture. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

assassin bug nymph

assassin bug nymph

5902   Hi, my name is Nancy. We have seen this bug inside around the house, in Winter months. In eastern Ontario, Canada. Have been looking all over the Web to try and identify but haven’t seen any pictures of it yet. thanks!  

 This is a late-instar nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), likely that of Reduvius ersonatus,     peridomestic species known as the masked hunter. These are reported as having a very painful but not dangerous bite. See http://tinyurl.com/23g4bdy for more detailed information     Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Casebearer larva

Casebearer larva

5901 What type of bug is this. found it in the bathroom. there’s more then 1

This looks like a household casebearer (aka ‘plaster bagworm’), Phereoeca uterella (Lepidoptera: Tineidae). Related to clothes moths, these basically are nuisance pests, feeding primarily on old cobwebs and the like. See http://tinyurl.com/hhc6w4v for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Psocid

Psocid

5900   Hello, I live in Kitchener, Ontario and it’s January right now. I just got this new townhouse last February and never noticed these little guys in my basement (basement only), till this month. It’s been snowing a lot and the house is quite dry, Im not sure if the basement is humid though, but we have the heat at 22 degrees inside. These little guys seem white from far until I took the picture. They are less than half a mm in size and when you spook them or touch them they just hop, they don’t fly, but hops quite fast. After taking these pictures I noticed they are really light brown and have little dots on them. I really hope they aren’t bed bugs or termites. New house and they are all over the basement concrete floor.  Thanks in advance!  Ivan. 

This is a psocid, commonly called booklice because of their association with books or paper. Booklice feed most commonly on molds as well as fungi, grains, insect fragments, and other starchy material, including glue from book bindings. In homes, they can be found in damp, warm, undisturbed places where mold and fungi are growing. For more information and control suggestions see http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/insects/find/psocids

 

fragment of a dead insect

fragment of a dead insect

5899  Found a few under my mattress. I came back from Costa Rica less than a week ago, and have been getting bites around my hands, ankles, a few on my chest. Standard red and itchy…. I have not seen any live bugs yet. Thought they were bed bugs at first, but I had them a few years ago, and was not affected by their bites.    thanks,  Justin

This is a fragment of a dead insect, possibly a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (hide/skin/larder/carpet beetles and allies). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Adult mouse

Adult mouse

5898  My name is Esther, I’m a single mom of 3 kids, 2 dogs, and 1 crested gecko. I had been hearing noises at night, but i brushed it away thinking it was my crested gecko’s activity since he is nocturnal, until i seen a rodent dash behind my fridge. I purchased glue traps and set them out,  In the past 3 days I’ve seen i adult rodent im assuming much larger then the ones ive captured. I’ve caught 3 rodents in my home, two identical in size and characteristics, 1 much smaller and different shape ears. My location is Los Banos California located in the Central Valley in California.  I was sure i had caught a rat the first 2 catches but the 32rd catch seemed the same in color yet it was much smaller and had larger ears. Could i have rats and mice?

This looks more like an adult mouse, such as a house mouse, than a young rat. See http://tinyurl.com/zkednfx   for some pointers on telling the difference. That aside, it is altogether possible to have both rats and mice; we have that situation on our property.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

cockroach young nymph

cockroach young nymph

5897   Hello, my name is Alex, I live in Hamilton, Ontario and it’s been a rather mild winter. I live in an apartment building with approx. 12 other units. This is the second bug of this breed that I’ve found. This one is much smaller than the first one I found though I was unable to get a photo. The “adult” one was a few cm long. Both have been found in my kitchen. This one is only about the size of my pinky fingernail. Thanks in advance,  Alex

This is a young nymph of a cockroach, likely a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (see http://tinyurl.com/hary6ge for an image) and http://tinyurl.com/h3nd9z8 elsewhere on this site for some control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Dermestidae beetle larva

Dermestidae beetle larva

5896   My name is Ian.  – Photo was taken on January 8, 2017. – Insect found in apartment in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
– About 2mm in length. – Indoors, on wall in a carpeted room. – Winter. – Thanks.

This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (hide/skin/larder/carpet beetles and allies), likely in the genus Anthrenus – see http://tinyurl.com/z3oqpsv for an example and http://tinyurl.com/zl9w25c elsewhere on this site for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

brown marmorated stink bug

brown marmorated stink bug

5895  Thanks for helping identify this bug.  It was indoors, in the master bedroom (bed) at 2am.  Felt it crawling on my back.  It was a good size bug, able to cling to a q-tip, while I was trying to shake it off.  I just spoke with my wife, and she said her friend found a similar bug crawling on the cupboard.  That’s 2 in two days. Should we be concerned?  Don. Stoney Creek, ON

This is a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). This is an introduced species that has become a serious pest in some areas of North America; they often invade buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. See http://tinyurl.com/nkexo3 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

bed bug

Bed Bug

5894  I found this bug it has a brown back with stripes on it it looks like a bed bug but im not sure.  Brandy. 

Yes this is a bed bug.  There could be many more where you found it.  You would be wise to have a professional do an inspection and discuss methods to eliminate the problem.  They are difficult to find.  For more information see:  http://pestcontrolcanada.com/how-to-get-rid-of-bed-bugs

 

broad-nosed/short-snouted weevils

broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil

5893  My name is jen i found this on my kitchen stove in toronto ontario i was wondering if someo e can help me please im terrified of bugs

This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; possibly in the subfamily Entiminae (broad-nosed/short-snouted weevils) – see http://tinyurl.com/heh23d5 for an example. Weevils such as these often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Leaf Beetle (pea or bean weevil)

Leaf Beetle (pea or bean weevil)

5892  I am from Nova Scotia.  Last week we came home to find these beatle/ bugs in our kitchen. They are black , hard shell, can fly or jump a little about 1/8 inch long max.  We have killed about twenty so far I squashed them with my thumb as they seem hard to kill any other way. They don’t come out in the dark.  They appear to come from our pantry where we have canned or sealed packaged food, nothing opened.  We did have an open bag of potatoes in that area.  Help.  Gary

This is a leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in the subfamily Bruchinae. Often called pea or bean weevils, the larvae of several species will infest seeds (primarily those of legumes), both dry stored ones or still in the field. If you have any stored seeds, including bird seed, check for signs of infestation. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Mud dauber wasp nests

Mud dauber wasp nests

5891  Please help us to identify the insect who left these cocoons in our books.  We found about 15 hard dark brown cocoons 2cm long attached to opposite side of the books in a bookshelf. Inside them there are light yellow larvae. Now when we found them it’s the end of august. We live in Ukraine.  Thank you very much for your help.

These are ‘nests’ of a mud dauber wasp (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae), likely in the genus Sceliphron. The adult wasps place live but paralyzed spiders within these structures that their larvae then feed upon. See http://tinyurl.com/h7pqegu for images and more information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

caddisfly

caddisfly

5890  See attached Photo a friend of mind took on New years eve, found in a home in Eastern  Newfoundland . Just curious as flying bugs in Winter doesn’t seem the Norm.

The image is not clear enough for me to be certain, but I believe that this could be a caddisfly (order Trichoptera) – see http://tinyurl.com/zghoj27 and http://tinyurl.com/hzmju2r for examples. It is not unusual for some species to be active in the winter time. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

wood wasp

wood wasp

5889   My name is Allan and I live in the Greater Toronto Area, Ontario.  Size is approx. 15 millimeter’s.   Month – December.
Temp – minus 6 to plus 6.   Found indoors of home, main floor.  I looked at the list of bugs on your site. Not sure if this is a wood wasp.

This is a wood wasp in the family Xiphydriidae in the genus Xiphydria – see  http://tinyurl.com/hbqw5wc for an example. Their larvae bore in dead wood, and are not known to be pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Milkweed bug

Milkweed bug

5888   Can you identify this bug? It appears in our house occasionally. Can they bite?   We are in Prince Edward County, Ontario. Thank you, M. Berkson

This is a milkweed bug, an occasional invader in homes. They are very similar in appearance to boxelder bugs.  See the comparison here:  http://pestcontrolcanada.com/box-elder-bugs   Both are harmless in your home. They don’t bite, have no stingers and don’t carry disease.

Saw-toothed or Merchant grain beetle

Saw-toothed or Merchant grain beetle

5887   Hello, I live in Kitchener Ontario (southern Ontario) and just moved into a newer house. I keep seeing These small bugs that I thought were ants until closer inspection. Any thoughts?  Josh.

This is a grain beetle (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) in the genus Oryzaephilus, either a saw-toothed (O. surinamensis) or merchant (O. mercator) grain beetle. Both species can infest a variety of grain-based dry stored food products, so you should check all your food storage areas for signs of infestation. See http://tinyurl.com/o5y5lxe for detailed information on these and other pantry pests.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

caterpillar of an Imperial moth

caterpillar of an Imperial moth

5886   Can you tell me what type of insect larvae this is? Thanks     Sherry

This appears to be a dead, mummified caterpillar of an Imperial moth, Eacles imperialis (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae). See http://tinyurl.com/bzm7v3h for more detailed information on this species. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

click beetle

click beetle

5885    I keep finding this bug in the beds of my house. they often appear dead. sometimes i find them on the floor also.  what is it ? Ashley 

This is a click beetle, Coleoptera: Elateridae; see http://tinyurl.com/7b399st     for some more examples. Their occurrence indoors is strictly accidental; they will do no harm there. The larvae of some species are known as wireworms, and those can be agricultural/garden pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

ground beetle larva

ground beetle larva

5884  Hi I have lived in Washington state all my life and have never ran across anything like this before. I was out at night in late fall and found this guy under a bunch of leave next to a “rollie pollie” bug, a big rollie pollie bug! Wondering if it’s related to the rollie pollie or if it’s something else ? Thank you Tammy. 

This is a repeat of post no. 5868, a ground beetle larva. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

brown marmorated stink bug

brown marmorated stink bug

5883  What is this bug found in hotel.  Raymond

This is a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), an introduced species that has become a serious pest in some areas of North America. See http://tinyurl.com/nkexo3 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

Drugstore Beetle

Drugstore Beetle

5882  Hi there, my name is Remi. Geological location is British Columbia, Canada. I have looked over your site a bit and I would figure this is a beetle, but what kind of beetle is unsure, matter of fact I didn’t even notice the antennas they had until I took a zoomed up picture of it.  Pretty sure they don’t fly, but upon recording a video they also opened their wings.. so at this point I’m not even sure what kind of bug they are.  I am really starting to wonder if these are a threat or can cause problems since more and more started showing up and I have no idea why, they’re not secluded to just one area either. I see them in the bathroom, the kitchen, the hallway near the living room, even in the corner of the room where my TV stand is and they most definitely seem drawn to light since we have a long hallway we end up using a night light and several always seem gathered below it or sometimes just on the wall. 

This appears to be a follow-up to the no. 5879 posting. This time, I can see the antennae, and there is no doubt that this is a drugstore beetle, Stegobium paniceum (Coleoptera: Anobiidae). The cigarette beetle lacks the three-segmented ‘club’ seen on your specimen.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

moth

Moths in garage

5881   Hi, I found a number of these bugs in the space above my garage in Nova Scotia. Last year and this year a woodpecker has done considerable damage and I just discovered why (I think).   What is it and how do I get rid of them?  Thank you,  Liam

This little moth would not be the source/cause of your woodpecker damage. Woodpeckers go after wood-boring insects, and neither this moth nor its larva (caterpillar) would bore in wood. Although I cannot provide a specific i.d., this moth belongs to one of the families collectively known as microlepidoptera (see http://tinyurl.com/jhgjvxy). The vast majority of caterpillars in this grouping feed within the leaves, stems, or seeds of various plants; see http://tinyurl.com/hx3zsu7 for an example. A few others feed on bits of organic matter found in the nests of birds or small rodents, see http://tinyurl.com/hras2h2 for an example.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

damsel bug

damsel bug

5880   I live in rural Ontario, Canada. These little bugs have been popping up over the past few weeks and I was wondering what they were. Thanks in advance.  -Risa

This is a damsel bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Nabidae), likely in the genus Nabis – see http://tinyurl.com/zvpoopk for an example. Damsel bugs are general predators on other small arthropods (mostly other insects), and thus often considered beneficial visitors to gardens.
Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

drugstore beetle

drugstore beetle

5879  Hi there, my name is Remi. Geological location is British Columbia, Canada. I have looked over your site a bit and I would figure this is a beetle, but what kind of beetle is unsure, matter of fact I didn’t even notice the antennas they had until I took a zoomed up picture of it. Pretty sure they don’t fly, but upon recording a video they also opened their wings.. so at this point I’m not even sure what kind of bug they are.  I am really starting to wonder if these are a threat or can cause problems since more and more started showing up and I have no idea why, they’re not secluded to just one area either. I see them in the bathroom, the kitchen, the hallway near the living room, even in the corner of the room where my TV stand is and they most definitely seem drawn to light since we have a long hallway we end up using a night light and several always seem gathered below it or sometimes just on the wall.

This looks to me like a drugstore beetle, Stegobium paniceum (Coleoptera: Anobiidae). This species and its close relative, the cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne (Coleoptera: Anobiidae) will infest a very wide variety of dry stored food products and other organic materials, so you should check all food storage areas (including dry pet food/bird seed, etc.) for signs of infestation. See http://tinyurl.com/psebz98 for more detailed information, including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Bot Fly Puparium

Bot Fly Puparium

5878  Last week I found one of these ‘shells’ and another this week. One was in plain site and the other was in a dark toy bin. The shell is hard and brittle and the inside has a pus like consistency, any information would be appreciated.   Thanks,  Nolan

This is a puparium of a rodent bot fly (Diptera: Oestridae; subfamily Cuterebrinae) in the genus Cuterebra. When the larvae of these flies are fully grown, they emerge from their rodent host in search of a dry place to undergo pupation – see http://tinyurl.com/zr7yx2g for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

long-jawed orb-weaving spider

long-jawed orb-weaving spider

5877  Spider found outdoors (residential back yard, running down flowerpot), Calgary Alberta on warm, early afternoon of May 25, 2015. Thank you very much!  Gerhard.

This is a long-jawed orb-weaving spider (family Tetragnathidae), likely in the genus Tetragnatha – see http://tinyurl.com/jnhdc7c for an image of one in a more typical pose. The webs of these spiders usually are more horizontal than vertical in orientation, and usually are constructed over or very near small bodies of water. They seem to specialize in preying on insects emerging from or approaching the water.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Grass bagworm case

Grass bagworm case

5876   Hello,  I live in North Bay Ontario Canada, right on the waters edge of Trout Lake I’ve seen these little pods all over the outside walls of the house, seems to be concrete or brick only though.  The total overall length is no more that .75 of an inch and maybe 1/4″ to 3/8″ of an inch across.  I assume they’re of biological origin simply because they’ve been attached to the wall. I’ve seen lots of posts elsewhere on the internet that talk about bagworms and show similar cocoons, although I haven’t read anywhere that they’re this small.

This looks like a case made by a grass bagworm, such as Psyche casta (Lepidoptera: Psychidae); see http://tinyurl.com/gt5arlr for some images. These caterpillars cause minimal damage to their host plants (mainly grasses). We often find similar cases on our house in West Virginia.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Western conifer seed bug

Western conifer seed bug

5875   I found this insect inside my house Dec. 1 in West Kelowna, BC.

This is a western conifer seed bug.  They are harmless around your home.  For more information see:  http://pestcontrolcanada.com/western-conifer-seed-bug

 

blow fly maggot

blow fly maggot

5874   Hi,I’d like some help in identifying the attached pics of larvae. They are dropping out of a pot light located in my bathroom – about 1-2 every couple of hours. The only place above the bathroom ceiling is an attic. (which contains only insulation as far as I know, since there is no interior access) They started dropping down two days ago.  I live in Comox, Vancouver Island, BC.   When I took the light bulb out, nothing is visible. Should I be taking down the whole light fixture?   I have seen no moths anywhere and I’ve checked out my pantry and it appears bug-free. All the dry goods are in plastic containers.If you can identify these, can you tell me how to get rid of them? Thank you. Dianne Alsop

This looks like a maggot, probably a blow fly maggot that has crawled away from a dead animal in your attic. There could be a dead rat near the pot light. You should have a professional inspect, disinfect and remove any dead rodents.  If you have been using rodent poison, you should switch to traps to avoid more dead rodents in your home.  See the life cycle of blow flies here: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/visibleproofs/galleries/technologies/blowfly.html